What China’s Organ Donation Program is Trying to Hide

This week, a delegation of international researchers and medical professionals are in Taiwan to discuss the issue of forced organ harvesting, unethical organ transplants and what lawmakers can do to stop transplant tourism. (Image: via  David Shoebridge)
This week, a delegation of international researchers and medical professionals are in Taiwan to discuss the issue of forced organ harvesting, unethical organ transplants and what lawmakers can do to stop transplant tourism. (Image: via David Shoebridge)

Allegations of forced organ harvesting in China. Earlier this week, China’s Ministry of Health and the state-run Red Cross Society of China announced that the country would launch a nationwide organ donation program by the end of the year. That comes as China’s organ transplant system – the second largest in the world – has been under increasing scrutiny over the past year.

The allegations are that China’s state-run hospitals are killing prisoners of conscience, like Falun Gong practitioners, house Christians, Tibetans and Uyghurs, for their organs. The organs are then sold for transplant. Chinese authorities insist that their organ transplants come from a small number of donors and from executed prisoners. But the numbers just don’t add up.

The issue has gotten increasing international attention. In fact, this week, a delegation of international researchers and medical professionals are in Taiwan to discuss the issue of forced organ harvesting, unethical organ transplants and what lawmakers can do to stop transplant tourism.

organ harvesting art organ crimes xiqiang dong falunart china's organ donation system

“Organ Crimes”, Oil on Canvas, by Xiqiang Dong (2007). (Xiqiang Dong/FalunArt.org)

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