Rainstorm Doesn’t Stop Candlelight Vigil for Tiananmen Massacre

The annual Hong Kong candlelight vigil to mark the 24th anniversary of the June 4 Tiananmen Massacre was held in Hong Kong’s Victoria Park on the evening of June 4, 2013. At least 150,000 people turned up for the event. (China Gaze)
The annual Hong Kong candlelight vigil to mark the 24th anniversary of the June 4 Tiananmen Massacre was held in Hong Kong’s Victoria Park on the evening of June 4, 2013. At least 150,000 people turned up for the event. (China Gaze)

The annual Hong Kong candlelight vigil to mark the 24th anniversary of the June 4 Tiananmen Massacre was held in Hong Kong’s Victoria Park on the evening of June 4. Lee Cheuk-Yan, the chairman of the Hong Kong Alliance In Support of Patriotic Democratic Movements in China, which organises the vigil, said that at least 150,000 people turned up at Victoria Park.

“Participants in tonight’s candlelight vigil hope to send a message to Beijing that Hong Kong’s citizens insist on justice for the Tiananmen Square massacre,” Lee said yesterday. While police released the official number in attendance at 54,000 people, six basketball courts were packed with people.

According to the South China Morning Post, among the participants in the night’s event was 84-year-old Liang Sing-ling, who has attended every vigil since 1990. “The most important thing is to vindicate the movement and mourn for the dead,” Liang said. “These are the reasons why people come every year.”

Another participant in the vigil was one of the 21 Tiananmen activists still wanted by the Communist Party. So far, he has not been identified, but he arrived in Hong Kong from the United States to join the event to mourn his comrades who died in the Tiananmen Massacre.

The other mainland dissidents or their relatives attending the event: Li Wanling, sister of June 4 blind activist Li Wangyang, who mainland authorities claimed committed suicide last year, and Lu Yanjing, the widow of Zhang Lin, who died in the Tiananmen protest.

Many people from Mainland China came to Hong Kong to join the candlelight vigil. A sudden rainstorm and heavy downpour didn’t drive the people away. An abrupt power failure made the candlelit night even more special. It was a very touching moment to see young and old people from all walks of life sitting there. Many of the people remained after the memorial.

Tiananmen Massacre hong kong june 4 vigil

Petitioners from Mainland China also joined the candlelight vigil to pay their respect to those who were killed by the Chinese regime during the Tiananmen Massacre of 1989. (China Gaze)

Tiananmen Massacre hong kong june 4 vigil

A daytime event before the candlelight vigil to pay respect to the many Chinese people who died at the Tiananmen Massacre (1989). (China Gaze)

Tiananmen Massacre hong kong june 4 vigil

A gentleman in black wrote on his backpack that he came from the Mainland to remember those who were killed by the Chinese regime during Tiananmen Massacre. (China Gaze)

Tiananmen Massacre hong kong june 4 vigil

A replica of the “Goddess of Democracy” that was first revealed to the public in 1989 at Tiananmen Square, right before the infamous Tiananmen Massacre. (China Gaze)

Tiananmen Massacre hong kong june 4 vigil

Families arrive in droves to attend the candlelight vigil to pay their respect to the many Chinese people killed by the Chinese Communist Party during the Tiananmen Massacre. (China Gaze)

Tiananmen Massacre hong kong june 4 vigil

June 4th, 2013 – A candlelight vigil to remember those who perished at the Tiananmen Massacre, 1989. Many of the people remained after the memorial. (China Gaze)

Tiananmen Massacre hong kong june 4 vigil

A touching moment to see young and old people from all walks of life sitting there, remembering those who sacrificed their lives at the Tiananmen Massacre, just so others can be free. (China Gaze)

Tiananmen Massacre hong kong june 4 vigil

Lighting candles in the rain to remember those who lost their lives at the Tiananmen Massacre 1989. (China Gaze)

Tiananmen Massacre hong kong june 4 vigil

A sudden rainstorm and heavy downpour didn’t drive the people away from attending the vigil for Tiananmen Massacre. (China Gaze)

Tiananmen Massacre hong kong june 4 vigil

An abrupt power failure made the candlelit night even more special in remembering those who perished at the Tiananmen Massacre. (China Gaze)

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