Moo Shu Pork, a Staple of American Chinese Cuisine

Moo Shu Pork originated in northern Chinese, possibly Shandong. It first appeared on the menus of Chinese restaurants in the United States in the late 1960s, and has become a staple of American Chinese cuisine. (Mark Mitchell/Flickr)
Moo Shu Pork originated in northern Chinese, possibly Shandong. It first appeared on the menus of Chinese restaurants in the United States in the late 1960s, and has become a staple of American Chinese cuisine. (Mark Mitchell/Flickr)

Recipe by M.S. Millken & S. Feniger

Moo shu pork originated in northern Chinese, possibly Shandong. It first appeared on the menus of Chinese restaurants in the United States in the late 1960s, and has become a staple of American Chinese cuisine.

Ingredients

2 tbsp soy sauce

1 tbsp dry sherry

1 tsp hoisin sauce

1/2 pound boneless lean pork, shredded

4 dried black mushrooms

2 cups finely shredded Napa cabbage

1 carrot, julienned

3 scallions, white and light green parts, slivered

1 cup bean sprouts

3 tbsp peanut oil

2 eggs, lightly beaten with 1/2 tsp salt

3 cloves garlic, minced

3 tsp freshly grated ginger

3 tbsp chicken stock

2 tbsp soy sauce

1 tbsp dry sherry

2 tsp sesame oil

1 tsp sugar

hoisin sauce (Chinese dipping sauce)

Directions

Combine soy sauce, sherry and hoisin sauce in a bowl. Add the pork, toss to coat evenly, cover, refrigerate, and marinate for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, soak the mushrooms in enough hot water to cover for 20 minutes. Drain and thinly slice. Set aside on a plate, along with the cabbage, carrot, and scallions.

Heat a wok or large skillet over medium/high heat. Add 1 tbsp of the peanut oil and swirl to coat. Pour in the eggs, swirling and tilting the wok to form a thin film. Cook just until the eggs are set and feel dry on top, about 1 minute. Transfer to a platter, let cool slightly, and cut into 1-inch strips.

Return the wok to high heat, and swirl in the remaining 2 tbsp oil. Add the garlic and ginger, and stir-fry to release the aromas, about 1 minute. Add the pork and stir-fry until lightly browned, about 2 minutes.

Add the reserved mushrooms, cabbage, carrot, bean sprouts, and scallions, along with the chicken stock, and stir-fry another 2 minutes. Stir in soy sauce, sherry, sesame oil, and sugar, and cook, stirring until the sauce boils, about 1 minute.

Add egg strips and mix well. To serve, spread a small amount of hoisin sauce on a warm Mandarin Pancake. Spoon about 1/2 cup moo shu mixture in the center of the pancake, wrap like a burrito, folding the ends to close, and serve.

Mandarin Pancakes

2 cups sifted flour

3/4 cup boiling water

1 to 2 tbsp sesame oil

Place flour into a medium bowl, making a well in the center. Pour in the boiling water, and use a wooden spoon or chopsticks to mix until a soft dough is formed. On a lightly floured surface, knead the dough gently until it is smooth and elastic, about 5 minutes. Cover with a damp towel and let rest for 20 minutes.

On a lightly floured surface, roll dough into a log, 16 inches long. Cut the log crosswise into 1-inch pieces, shape each piece into a ball, then use your hands to flatten each ball into a pancake. Brush the tops of the pancakes lightly with the sesame oil.

Then, place one pancake on top of a second pancake, oiled sides together, so that there are 8 pairs. With a rolling pin, flatten each pair into a 6 inch circle. (A tortilla press also works well for this.) Cover the pancakes with a damp towel to rest.

Heat an ungreased, nonstick skillet over medium heat. Cook the pancakes, one at a time, turning them once as they puff and little bubbles appear on the surface, until lightly browned, about 2 minutes on each side. As each pancake is finished, remove from pan and gently separate the halves into 2 pancakes while still hot.

Stack cooked pancakes on a plate while cooking the remaining pancakes.

Serve pancakes while still warm with the moo shu pork. Or the pancakes may be prepared up to 1 day in advance, wrapped in plastic, and refrigerated. Pancakes may also be frozen. Reheat them by steaming for 5 minutes, or warming them in a 3500F (1800C) oven, wrapped in foil, for 10 minutes, Yield: 16 pancakes.

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