Flight of Edward Snowden to Hong Kong Benefited Beijing

edward-snowden-PRISM-NSAUS-governmentAdam-Hart-Davis1

In June 2013, Edward Snowden defected from America to Hong Kong and disclosed the U.S. government’s “PRISM” surveillance program for monitoring telephone communications and Internet activities of U.S. citizens and foreigners. This news shocked the world.

The current “PRISM” program begins and ends at preventing and stopping terrorism in the U.S. Snowden’s praise of China’s human rights feigns ignorance. Snowden, a former employee of a service contractor for the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), is a 29-year-old high school dropout.

It’s doubtful that he understands world affairs or knows the meaning of freedom and human rights. In fact, the statements Snowden made publicly in Hong Kong display his ignorance. Snowden said the reason he chose Hong Kong was that he had confidence in the rule of law in Hong Kong and admired China’s human rights situation.

This argument is so naive that any Hong Kong resident would think it’s laughable! In the end, Snowden was forced to leave Hong Kong and travel to Russia. He did not get the protection of Hong Kong’s law in which he had so much “confidence,” nor did he experience the Chinese human rights he so “trusted.”

His father is urging him not to betray his country. In a speech on national television, he warned his son not to further divulge national secrets and to not betray his country; he’s advised Snowden to return to face trial.

No matter whether China was involved in plotting Snowden’s attempted defection or not, it served as advantageous to the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). During the period of his uncertain future in Hong Kong, Snowden was very likely under the watchful eye of China. The authorities in Beijing would have sent someone to obtain information from him.

On June 21, the U.S. Justice Department requested the Hong Kong authorities to extradite Snowden on the grounds of espionage, theft, and transfer of government property.

Letting Snowden go from Hong Kong on June 23 indicates that the CCP doesn’t mind damaging current Sino-US relationships. After gathering what intelligence Snowden had to offer, they dumped him as a burden onto a third country.

A Chinese Snowden could be 10 times worse

Netizens predict that the Snowden defection will encourage more Chinese people to defect. The CCP will be keeping a close watch on its Internet monitoring staff, particularly those in key positions.

The CCP is accused of committing Internet hacking, theft of other country’s commercial and military secrets, and intellectual property infringement. In addition, the Chinese government openly censors the Internet, deprives its citizens the right to information, monitors online communications, and punishes dissidents based on their words alone.

Just imagine if someone fled from that system and exposed Chinese Internet monitoring secrets and the inner workings behind China’s Internet hacking attacks. It would certainly cause an uproar 10 or even 100 times bigger than Snowden’s.

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