Heroes, Protests, and Crackdowns on China National Day

A Uyghur bazaar in Xinjiang, China. Oct. 1 was also the Muslim holiday Eid al-Adha. In preparation authorities further heightened their security measures around Xinjiang by increasing armed patrols. (Image: Todenhoff/Flickr)
A Uyghur bazaar in Xinjiang, China. Oct. 1 was also the Muslim holiday Eid al-Adha. In preparation authorities further heightened their security measures around Xinjiang by increasing armed patrols. (Image: Todenhoff/Flickr)

To “welcome” China National Day on Oct. 1, Chen Jianxiong and Xie Wenfei took to the street the day before and hoisted banners advocating democracy and demanding the abolition of the one-party dictatorship and the establishment of democratic rule. They’ve since been named warriors of the South China movement by Chinese netizens.

On “National Day,” as in previous years, Chinese authorities stepped up their monitoring of domestic dissidents and petitioners.

Oct. 1 was also the Muslim holiday Eid al-Adha. In preparation authorities further heightened their security measures around Xinjiang by increasing armed patrols and inspections of individuals.

According to news reports from the Uyghur congress organization, a dozen Uyghur people were arrested at Xinjiang state road inspections last week under charges of obstructing officers from carrying out their duties. Local residents reported intensified security measures and the setting up of check points at state road junctions to stop and inspect motorists and their passengers.

Beijing authorities intensified their surveillance of Yijiahamu Tuheti, the Uyghur scholar and Internet activist. They severed his computer network connection in his home and dispatched at least four state security agents to monitor his whereabouts.

In addition, the Beijing authorities cleared the gathering places of petitioners throughout the city. According to petitioners’ reports, the police arrested nearly 100 individuals.

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