Missing Malaysian Plane: Chaos as Screaming Chinese Relatives Dragged Away

After 12 anxiety-laden days of waiting for the missing plane to be found, Chinese family members became distraught at a press briefing in Kuala Lumpur. (Screenshot/The Telegraph video)
After 12 anxiety-laden days of waiting for the missing plane to be found, Chinese family members became distraught at a press briefing in Kuala Lumpur. (Screenshot/The Telegraph video)

After 12 anxiety-laden days of waiting for the missing Malaysian plane MH370 carrying 239 passengers to be found, Chinese family members became distraught at yesterday’s press briefing in Kuala Lumpur. Police dragged them out as they screamed: “We can’t stand it anymore!” according to a report by The Telegraph.

153 of the passengers on the flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing were Chinese, and a handful of their family members burst into the conference yesterday with a banner demanding that the government “Tell the Truth,” and threatening hunger strikes as they accused Malaysia of a cover-up.

One mother, whose son is missing, was knocked to the ground among the scuffle of international media, cameras, police, and protesters. She was hauled from the room wailing:, “Where are they? Where are they?” according to a Washington Post report.

Brushing off criticism that they are being slow to follow leads or holding back information, Malaysian Defense Minister Hishammuddin Hussein said they are working hard with the FBI and international law enforcement officials.

“Our priority has always been to find the aircraft,” he said at Tuesday’s press conference, as reported in The Washington Post. “We would not withhold any information that could help. But we also have a responsibility not to release information until it has been verified by the international investigation team.”

Meanwhile, the reports from yesterday that locals from the Indian Ocean Maldives islands had seen a low-flying plane on the morning of March 8 have been investigated and dismissed as wrong by the government and military.

This is becoming one of the biggest mysteries in aviation history, and despite intensive investigations, no conclusions about motives or destination for what is believed to be a deliberate hijack have been made public.

BBC world news coverage video here:

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