He Made the Mistake of Trying to Fly a Drone Camera Over Beijing’s Government Headquarters

Well, that was a mistake. Leave it up to foreigners to not know when and where to take pictures in China.

Let me clarify. If you happen to be in China during the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre—or as it’s known in China “nothing happened day,” you most likely shouldn’t fly your drone over secret government buildings and try and take pictures. At least that’s the lesson that photographer Trey Ratcliff learned the hard way.

Let’s back up a few paces. For all those who don’t know, a drone is a little quadcopter that photographers attach a small camera to (usually a GoPro) which allows them to fly around in the sky and take pictures.

Ratcliff was using his drone around Beijing for a few days without problems, until he tried to fly over the Forbidden City and Beijing’s other government buildings.

Needless to say, the government didn’t like this very much and brought Radcliff and his quadcopter in for questioning, suspecting he was a spy. Long story short, he was taken to a dimly lit interrogation room, but eventually got off with a stern warning.

For more information about New Zealand photorapher,Trey Ratcliff, and his live-on-the-edge lifestyle check out his blog.

Ratcliff was using his drone around Beijing for a few days without problems, until he tried to fly over the Forbidden City and Beijing's other government buildings. (Youtube)

Ratcliff was using his drone around Beijing for a few days without problems, until he tried to fly over the Forbidden City and Beijing’s other government buildings. (Youtube)

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