Bad Feng Shui Stabs Hong Kong Bank

The cannon-like structure is there to counteract the swords atop the Bank of China building (Image: Vision Times)
The cannon-like structure is there to counteract the swords atop the Bank of China building (Image: Vision Times)

The Feng Shui of the buildings that house the Bank of China (Hong Kong) and the Shanghai Banking Corporation has affected their performance, according to local legend.

In the 1990s, the Bank of China headquarters was Hong Kong’s tallest skyscraper. Part of its design was to resemble growing bamboo shoots, which symbolize livelihood and prosperity. These sound like good qualities for a bank to have, but other aspects had negative impacts.

The "swords" on top of the Bank of China building sends bad energy to the governor's house and HSBC building. (Image: Vision Times)

The ‘swords’ on top of the Bank of China building send bad energy to the governor’s house and HSBC building. (Image: Vision Times)

When the Bank of China was being built, they didn’t seek guidance from a Feng Shui master. You see, in Hong Kong, fengshui plays a very important role. At the top of the building are two long steel poles that Feng Shui practitioners say act as swords.

The sword on one side points to the governor’s house. It was believed the strong energy of that sword negatively affected the governor’s house. Willow trees were planted at the house to reduce that effect.

The other sword points to the HSBC headquarters. The bank’s fiscal returns went downhill after the new building was built.

To counter the sword’s energy, HSBC put two cannon-shaped objects on top of the building pointed directly at the Bank of China. Ever since, the bank’s performance has gone up.

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