A Decade of Aid Cash Brings Little Cheer for Disabled Afghan Orphans

Some of the children at the Window for Hope orphanage in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Courtesy of Window for Hope’s Facebook page)
Some of the children at the Window for Hope orphanage in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Courtesy of Window for Hope’s Facebook page)

The outpour of international aid to Afghanistan over the past decade was meant to transform the country’s welfare standards.

However, orphanages in Kabul are revealing that the most vulnerable children have seen little to no benefit from the billions in aid money that has poured in.

Windows of Hope is an orphanage in the center of Kabul, Afghanistan’s war torn capitol. With a staff comprised of mostly volunteers they make the best out of a small budget, which is supposed to cover 12 children, most of whom are severely disabled.

The house manager Frozan is able to provide basic living conditions, minimal comfort, and security despite the sparse conditions.

The young children have been neglected by the Afghan government as well as a number of international charities which have received funding over the past decade.

Frozan told a reporter from AFP: “These are the children who do not have anyone who cares for them.”

She added that the children’s severe disabilities mean that someone has to be with them every moment of the day. Many of them are victims of war who have lost their families as she explains:

“They have suffered, they have mental issues, and their relatives are not prepared to keep them.”

Some of the disabled kids at Window for Hope orphanage in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Courtesy of Window for Hope’s Facebook page)

Some of the disabled kids at Window for Hope orphanage in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Courtesy of Window for Hope’s Facebook page)

After the United States invaded Afghanistan in 2001, a huge aid development program was been put together to try and rebuild the torn country.

Aid money has been used to build hospitals, roads, and new schools. Aid has also increased to fund adult literacy classes, farms and even craft workshops.

The impact of these programs has been quite limited and there is much to be done as far as providing infrastructure and social care throughout the country.

 

 

 

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