Chinese Regime Begins Survey of Officials’ Unusual Deaths and Suicides

Unusual deaths of officials between Dec. 2012 and Dec. 2014, claimed to be due to illegal acts, mental illness like depression, pressure from work and life, family conflicts, unclear reasons, or other reasons. (Image: Caixin)
Unusual deaths of officials between Dec. 2012 and Dec. 2014, claimed to be due to illegal acts, mental illness like depression, pressure from work and life, family conflicts, unclear reasons, or other reasons. (Image: Caixin)

The Chinese Communist Party has instructed organizations across the country to compile details of officials who have died under abnormal circumstances.

An example of a survey form was provided by ifeng News, showing the details required in Shantou City, Guangdong Province:

  1. Death date between Dec. 2012 and Dec. 2014.
  2. Number of officials, including local county Party members in position and retired, whose deaths were considered unusual.
  3. Unusual means: committed suicide, murdered, road accident, death at work place, mistreatment at hospital, fire, and death sentences.
  4. Age at time of death.
  5. Position when died, starting from provincial to local head of village.
  6. Death time and cause of death (provide details).
  7. If suicide, name the place and the reason.
  8. Method of suicide, eg jump from building or bridge, jump into river, lie on railway, hanging, take medicine, cut himself, shot himself.
  9. Reason for suicide: (a) family problem, (b) stress from work, (c) illegal case or corruption, (d) mental illness.
  10. Provide details if death happened after anti-corruption team investigated him.

Since President Xi Jinping started his anti-corruption campaign, there has been an increase in the number of officials who have committed suicide.

In 2013, over 6,500 officials disappeared without a trace, more than 8,000 went overseas, and about 1,250 killed themselves.

Around 17,000 officials working in public security, government ministries, state-owned enterprises, and overseas offices and consulates either disappeared or left China since the 1990s, including senior-level cadres. They are thought to have taken up to 800 billion yuan ($128 billion) with them.

Working as a high-ranking official is said to be a highly dangerous position, like a bomb that can explode at any time. Those officials who choose to kill themselves are probably trying to save their families, superiors, or others from being involved in corruption scandals, according to NTDTV.

Bloggers commented on the news:

  • “One man dies to save his whole family and gang so it is worth it.”
  • “Who should take responsibility for the suicides of those corrupted officials?”

There’s a new fatal illness. It’s called ‘Chinese depression.’

Research by Mona and Lulu

(Image: Caixin)

Unusual deaths of officials between Dec. 2012 and Dec. 2014, claimed to be due to illegal acts, mental illness like depression, pressure from work and life, family conflicts, unclear reasons, or other reasons. (Image: Caixin)

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