How Do You See China? This Inspiring Video Shows the Brighter Side

With all the bad news about China’s corruption and pollution, it would be easy to imagine that it’s a horrible, filthy place that’s not worth visiting.

Some of those Beijing smog pictures are pretty awful!

But China is such a huge country that it spans five time zones (although they all have one time!) and ranges from southern subtropical forests to steppes and deserts in the north.

It has a rich history and culture that stretches back over 5,000 years and numerous dynasties, with a wealth of traditional values and knowledge.

This exciting video captures some of the wonder of China—that incredible ethnic mix, the vast and hectic metropolis contrasted with alpine lakes and pristine forests, delicious and often unusual food, all at the rapid pace of modern life, but with some pauses for reflection and moving meditation.

(Screenshot/YouTube)

Jiuzhai Valley National Park in Sichuan. (Screenshot/YouTube)

It was filmed over five months by a European team who visited Guilin, Sichuan, Inner Mongolia, Beijing, and Shanghai.

The sleek skyline of Shanghai. (Screenshot/YouTube)

The sleek skyline of Shanghai. (Screenshot/YouTube)

As director Robin Mahieux says on his Vimeo page: “After traveling all around China, we wanted to show to people that China is not only pollution and communism, but also a beautiful country, full of wonderful places and amazing people.”

The initiative is from Integrate Chinese Life, and its goal is to give a view of

China through unbiased eyes, subverting the negative image many young people have of this magnificent country.

And if like me you’re wondering what some of that food is—apart from the live scorpions on a stick—apparently you can see oyster omelet at 2’22, and a traditional desert called “Sugar Onion” at 2’27.

A traditional desert called 'Sugar Onion.' (Screenshot/YouTube)

A traditional desert called ‘Sugar Onion.’ (Screenshot/YouTube)

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