How To Get Your Point Across About ‘Fracking’ 101

Fracking waste water going into an unlined pit. 
(Screenshot/YouTube )
Fracking waste water going into an unlined pit. (Screenshot/YouTube )

Have you ever had that one person who just won’t listen when it comes to “Fracking,” the term used by gas and oil industries for hydraulic fracturing?

Nebraskan farmer James Osborne is a champion at getting them to listen.

This local farmer was met with silence after he invited members of the pro-fracking board, at a Nebraska Oil & Gas Conservation committee hearing, to drink glasses of water that were tainted by the fracking process.

Nebraskan James Osborne pouring out water containing his own “private mixture” of fracking additives Image: Screenshot/YouTube

Nebraskan James Osborne pouring out water containing his own “private mixture” of fracking additives
(Screenshot/YouTube)

While pouring out water containing his own “private mixture” of fracking additives, he had just 3 minutes to visually explain what fracking waste can do to the water table.

The committee is holding public hearings on a proposal by an oil company to ship out-of-state fracking waste water into Nebraska, where it will be dumped into a “disposal well” in Sioux County.

The local farmer was meet with silence after he invited members of the pro-fracking board, at a Nebraska Oil & Gas Conservation committee hearing, to drink glasses of water that were tainted by the fracking process.  Image: Screenshot/YouTube

The local farmer was meet with silence after he invited members of the pro-fracking board, at a Nebraska Oil & Gas Conservation committee hearing, to drink glasses of water that were tainted by the fracking process.
(Screenshot/YouTube)

 

According to a report, the Terex Energy Corporation wants to truck as much as 10,000 barrels a day of the chemical-laden fracking waste water to a ranch north of Mitchell, Nebraska, for disposal, reported RawStory.

Nebraskan James Osborne tells the committee what he thinks:

We watch as he explains that he still has ties with the oil industry, and that he is on the fence about fracking.

Osbourne explained fluid dynamics to the board while pouring out three cups of the murky water that may result from any spills or from it seeping into the water table.

Osbourne then said: “So you told me this morning that you would drink this water,” as he pointed to the cups.

Nebraskan James Osborne  “So would you drink it? Yes or no?” he asked. Image: Screenshot/YouTube

Nebraskan James Osborne asked: “So would you drink it? Yes or no?” (Screenshot/YouTube)

“So would you drink it? Yes or no?” he asked, only to have them remain silent until a member explained they wouldn’t be answering any questions.

“Oh, you can’t answer any questions? Well, my answer would be ‘no.’ I don’t want this in the water that will travel entirely across this state in three days,” Osborne said.

“There is no doubt there will be contamination. There will be spills.”

Osborne then thanked the committee, leaving the glasses on the table, and as he left there was loud applause .

This was be best demonstration on the pitfalls of fracking I’ve seen in a long time.

Can Kevlar Be Replaced by Something Even Stronger?
This Is What It Feels Like to Go Through a Severe Sandstorm in China