This 6-Year-Old Tells How Climate Change Affects Him and His Family

Noah Gue is a first grader who lives in Montana, and has a passionate message to share about climate change.  (Screenshot/YouTube)
Noah Gue is a first grader who lives in Montana, and has a passionate message to share about climate change. (Screenshot/YouTube)

Noah Gue is a first grader who lives in Montana. He has a message for all of us. He has seen climate change “with my own eyes.” Noah has been to the White House and shown his video on how climate change is affecting his family and community.

Little Noah Gue with President Barack Obama at the White House:

In his compelling 3-minute video, the 6-year-old looks into the camera and tells us how rising temperatures are affecting his family. He walks through partly bare hillsides that were once covered in snow, to intensifying forest fires, which his dad has to risk his life to go and fight.

Noah's dad is a Firefighter Image: Screenshot/YouTube

Noah’s dad is a firefighter, and climate change is extending the fire season and intensity of the fires.
(Screenshot/YouTube)

“Glaciers are receding and could soon be gone forever… Some animals may go extinct in the next century… It’s time for the world to see conservation through a kid’s eyes,” he says in “Noah’s Project,” which was honored at the White House.

Noah and his parents attended an event for the 15 finalists of this year’s White House Student Film Festival.

Noah’s Project: On a mission to inspire conservation:

“He’s so little. I didn’t know he’d have the stamina to do it,” Amy Larson Gue said to National Geographic. “We’ve never done anything like that before, but he was comfortable in front of the camera, and passionate about doing the project.”

When Noah saw his grandmother’s book about Glacier National Park, she told him what the glaciers looked like when she was a girl. It was then the video became a family affair.

Noah and his younger brother Image: Screenshot/YouTube

Noah and his younger brother. (Screenshot/YouTube)

“So we thought, we’ve got to go see them now,” says Amy, who took photos of Noah and his 3-year-old brother Theodore (named for Theodore Roosevelt) visiting that park, as well as Yellowstone and Paradise Valley. Dad Michael, a wild-land firefighter with the U.S. Forest Service, recorded their travels with his GoPro camera, and used Apple’s iMovie app to weave in Amy’s pictures to produce the video, wrote National Geographic.

Noah also is shown helping a great horned owl rescue Image: Screenshot/YouTube

Noah also is shown helping a great horned owl rescue. (Screenshot/YouTube)

Noah also is shown helping a great horned owl rescue. His mom says he wants to expand the project to look at animals in the wild. “My hope is that the pictures we are taking will inspire others to protect the environment,” he says in the video.

It is great that children are taking an active role in the climate change debate, as it is their future.

Why Has the U.S. Stopped China's Supercomputer Upgrade?
How Has Antibiotic Resistance Become Such a Huge Problem?