The ‘Incredible’ Typewriter Artist: Cerebral Palsy Is no Excuse

From the debilitating effects of cerebral palsy, the movements in Paul Smith‘s hands and arms were very uncoordinated. Yet with sheer determination, he managed to use his typewriter to create detailed and naturalistic artwork, as any great sketch artist does.

Paul used 10 specific keys on his typewriter to add depth and texture to produce his own version of the Mona Lisa, as well as hundreds of landscapes, portraits, and animal artworks that held personal significance to him.

Paul could not use a brush or pen for his drawings, but as a teenager, he found another unconventional medium to express his artistic talent.

Artwork Typed by Paul Smith…

 

The detail in  the mill is astounding (Image:image-my-so-called-luck.de:googleimages)

The detail in the mill is astounding. (Image:image:my-so-called-luck.de/googleimages)

 

Paul captures the majesty of the lions (image-banglewoodcrafts.com:googleimages)

Paul captures the majesty of the lions. (Image: banglewoodcrafts.com/googleimages)

 

The Mona Lisa is one of Paul Smiths most well-known depictions (image-abovetopsecret.com:googleimages)

The Mona Lisa is one of Paul Smith’s most well-known depictions. (Image: abovetopsecret.com/googleimages)

 

Paul not only has right proportions in his portraits, he captures expression wonderfully (image-waterbrand.wordpress.com:googleimages)

Paul not only has proper proportions in his portraits, he captures expressions wonderfully. (Image: waterbrand.wordpress.com/googleimages)

Paul Smith passed away in 2007, without ever officially publishing any of his artworks. His legacy and achievements, as well as his humble and kind nature, is a lasting inspiration to those with disabilities.

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