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Man Gets $6.25 Million for Being Wrongfully Imprisoned

In 1989, Jonathan Fleming was convicted of a Brooklyn murder that he did not commit. Here he is with family members after being exonerated last year. (Screenshot/YouTube)
In 1989, Jonathan Fleming was convicted of a Brooklyn murder that he did not commit. Here he is with family members after being exonerated last year. (Screenshot/YouTube)

After being jailed for nearly 25 years, Jonathan Fleming was freed last year after it was found he was wrongfully convicted of a shooting murder. Now, a year later, he is being compensated to the tune of $6.25 million for his wrongful conviction, and amen to that.

After being freed, Fleming had $93 to his name and nowhere to live.

Now, he is finally being paid something to make amends for what happened to him and his family.

See this video below for how life on the outside was for Fleming and Jeffrey Deskovic, another innocent man wrongly convicted, after their release:

“I never gave up. I had faith. I said to myself I don’t know how long it’s going to take, but I’m going to get out,” Fleming told The Guardian last year just after he was exonerated.

Despite his nightmarish ordeal, and that he was facing an uncertain life upon his release, Fleming said he is not bitter from his experience.

“I’m not angry,” Fleming said. “But I think about all the things I could have accomplished during that time, and I come out to nothing. No housing. No nothing.”

“I missed the opportunity to raise my sons to be young men. I missed being there with my mother,” he said. “Her health is real bad, and I know she doesn’t have much time left since she is very ill. All those things were running through my head.”

For a news report done upon his exoneration, see below:

Fleming’s conviction was based on testimony by an eyewitness that was later recanted by the witness, saying she lied to get out of an unrelated arrest.

After that, efforts by his family, private investigators, and the Brooklyn District Attorney’s Conviction, along with the discovery of a phone receipt, proved that Fleming was not at the scene of the crime, but travelling to Disneyland on holidays with his family.

It appears the receipt was held back from the judicial process, and not given to the defense team to argue his case.

The receipt was in the possession of the police.

The video below is a panel discussion from The Young Turks about Fleming’s case, which includes lawyer Steve Oh, who spent some time as a prosecutor:

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