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Watch This Amazing Interactive Video on Asteroids

Astronomer Scott Manley from Armagh Observatory in the U.K. has created an interactive 360 degree view video for you. 
(Screenshot/YouTube)
Astronomer Scott Manley from Armagh Observatory in the U.K. has created an interactive 360 degree view video for you. (Screenshot/YouTube)

Have you ever wondered what the night sky would look like if you were able to see all the asteroids in space? Astronomer Scott Manley from Armagh Observatory in the U.K. has created an interactive 360 degree view video for us.

In the YouTube video, we are able to see 5,000 asteroids that are nearest to Earth. Manley explains that asteroids are not visible to the naked eye like stars and planets; this is because they’re much smaller and fainter.

By speeding up time, Manley shows the motion of all these asteroids as they travel relative to Earth’s rotation.

If you could see all the asteroids, what would the sky look like?

In the wonderful 360 degree video below, it’s imagined that you’re standing on Earth and are looking up at the sky all around you. The awesome thing is, you can even play around with it by dragging the top cursor around in the video, Science Dump wrote.

“I am just turning on the asteroids and making the asteroids near the Earth visible, as if they were stars. Now this is the 5,000 or so asteroids nearest the Earth,” Manley said.

“You can see them following their paths, flying near to the Earth and going away, their motion is a combination of the Earth’s motion and the asteroids’ motion.”

Asteroids—crash course astronomy:

“We’re essentially flying around the sun through this population of asteroids with our eyes closed,” Scott Manley said in the video.

Manley also explains that these are just the Near-Earth Objects (NEO) that we know about. It is currently estimated that we have only found approximately 1 percent of all NEOs that exist. One of the reasons for this is we can’t point telescopes at the Sun; this means that asteroids in its vicinity remain undetected.

The solution to this problem would involve installing a space telescope somewhere between Earth and the Sun. This would allow the telescope to see many of the NEOs that we cannot see from Earth.

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