http://www.visiontimes.com/?p=82089

Denmark Produced More Electricity Then It Needed Using Wind Turbines

With higher than normal winds, Denmark met all of its electricity needs plus more, which it sent to Germany, Norway, and Sweden. (Image: Pixabay/ CC0 Public Domain)
With higher than normal winds, Denmark met all of its electricity needs plus more, which it sent to Germany, Norway, and Sweden. (Image: Pixabay/ CC0 Public Domain)

With higher than normal winds, Denmark met all of its electricity needs plus more, which it sent to Germany, Norway, and Sweden.

On that unusually windy day, it produced 116 percent of its needs from wind turbines alone. But by 3 am the next morning when demand had dropped, the figure rose to 140 percent. Germany and Norway received 80 percent of the surplus, which could be stored in hydro-power systems for use later.

Denmark—offshore wind power hub:

“It shows that a world powered 100 percent by renewable energy is no fantasy,” Oliver Joy, a spokesman for the European Wind Energy Association trade body told The Guardian. “Wind energy and renewable’s can be a solution to de-carbonization—and also security of supply at times of high demand.”

According to The Guardian, the figures emerged on the website of the Danish transmission systems operator energinet.dk, which provides a minute-by-minute account of renewable power in the national grid. The site shows that Denmark’s wind farms were not even operating at their full 4.8GW capacity at the time of yesterday’s peaks.

Denmark considers phasing out coal by 2025 in big green shift:

Denmark has long been a global leader in renewable energy.

With almost unanimous political consensus, the 5.6 million-strong Danish population has in recent years pushed aggressively for the installation of new wind farms across the country, with the goal of producing half of its electricity via renewable sources by 2020. And in 2014, Denmark announced to the world that it aimed to end burning fossil fuels entirely—not just for electricity, but also for transportation—by 2050, Gizmodo wrote.

It seems that Denmark is well and truly on its way to keeping its promise. It is good to see, and hopefully other countries can and will follow in its footsteps.

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