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It Looks Radioactive, but You Can Eat This Glowing Goo

So, what in the world is this substance?

It glows, it’s neither solid nor liquid, and you can eat it!

It’s “Magic Mud,” and Grant Thompson, the “King of Random,” shows you how to make it in this video.

This goo can make quite a mess, so prepare it in a place that is easy to clean up. It’s not any problem, though, as it’s non-toxic.

If you’ve got a some potatoes…

A bag of potatoes processed, is a main ingredient (Image:Grant Thompson/Youtube Screenshot)

A bag of potatoes that are processed is the main ingredient. (Image: Grant Thompson/Youtube Screenshot)

… a bottle of tonic water…

Tonic water glows under black lights because it contains quinine (Image:Grant Thompson/Youtube Screenshots)

Tonic water glows under a black light because it contains quinine. (Screenshot/YouTube)

… and a little time, then you’ve got everything you need to make glowing goo!

Method

Step 1

Wash a whole bag of potatoes, keeping the skins on. Cut potatoes into halves or quarters and put them into the food processor to grate them finely. If you don’t own a processor, just cut them as finely as you can.

Use a food processor to finely cut up the potatoes (Image:Grant Thompson.Youtube Screenshots)

Use a food processor to finely cut up the potatoes. (Screenshot/YouTube)

Step 2

Put your chopped potatoes into a large bowl and cover with hot water. Stir this for a few minutes—the water will turn a pink hue, which is normal.

Cover potatos with hot water, then stir (Image:Grant Thompson/Youtube Screenshot)

Cover potatoes with hot water, then stir. (Screenshot/YouTube)

Step 3

Strain this mixture into another large bowl. Allow the liquid to settle, and watch as a white sediment collects on the bottom.

Strain into another large bowl (Image:Grant Thompson/Youtube Screenshot)

Strain into another large bowl. (Screenshot/YouTube)

Step 4

Pour out the dirty potato water. The white sediment on the bottom is pretty dense, and will hold fast to the bottom of the bowl—this is magic mud!

Pour out the murky water and leave behind the white sediment (Image:Grant Thompson/Youtube Screenshot)

Pour out the murky water and leave behind the white sediment. (Screenshot/YouTube)

Step 5

Rinse the mud again with water to remove any impurities. Now, you are ready to let your mud dry out and turn into powder.

Rinse with water again to remove the impurities in the magic mud (Image:Grant Thompson/Youtube Sreenshot)

Rinse with water again to remove the impurities in the magic mud. (Screenshot/YouTube)

Step 6

It will take a couple of days for the mud to dry. Once this happens, break up the mud into powder with a spoon. Slowly add tonic water and stir. The mud will rehydrate to take on the same characteristic as before—not liquid, not solid.

Add a small amount of tonic water to the powder to add the fluorescence (Image:Grant Thompson/Youtube Screenshot)

Add a small amount of tonic water to the powder to add the fluorescence. (Screenshot/YouTube)

Your magic mud now has it’s glowing quality, so set up your black lights—it’s play time!

Wow, that looks messy (Image:Grant Thompson/Youtube Screenshot)

Wow, that looks messy! (Screenshot/YouTube)

This project will amaze and freak out your friends at Halloween, or in an educational school science project.

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