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Has North Korea Got the Military to Back Up Its Crazy Talk?

North Korea is a nuclear-armed rogue nation whose threats need to be taken seriously, says the Pentagon. Above is a 16-wheel carrier truck with a missile capable of carrying a nuclear warhead exhibited during a parade. (Image: Flickr/Stefan Krasowski)
North Korea is a nuclear-armed rogue nation whose threats need to be taken seriously, says the Pentagon. Above is a 16-wheel carrier truck with a missile capable of carrying a nuclear warhead exhibited during a parade. (Image: Flickr/Stefan Krasowski)

If you’ve been monitoring the news, you’d have seen how North Korea has been threatening military action against South Korea over some broadcasting speakers set up near the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ).

These are the same speakers that caused both nations’ armies to send explosive projectiles at each other on Thursday.

The thin-skinned North Korean regime then added similar threats against the U.S. because of joint U.S.-South Korean exercises being conducted in the South beginning Monday. The Pentagon, according to the below video, takes these threats seriously:

The reason why the Pentagon takes the threat seriously is that the regime is unpredictable or to put it in laymen’s terms—the guys in Pyongyang are freaking crazy.

If you’re in anyway aware of how North Korea operates, you’d know it’s not the first time they’ve used threatening and insane language.

I’ve lost count of how many times I’ve heard it before. It’s farcical. The farce reached its zenith last year when the North threatened “merciless” retaliation over the Hollywood comedy film The Interview, which was about a ridiculous plot to kill North Korea’s dictator Kim Jong-un.

The North Koreans said that the release of the movie would be considered an “act of war.”

A year earlier Kim declared “a state of war” with the South for another reason, but nothing came from that. They also threatened to send rockets at Guam, Hawaii, and the U.S. mainland, says the The Washington Post.

Note a pattern here folks.

In a 2009 New York Times interview, former South Korean president Kim Young-sam said: “I think the North Koreans think they can say whatever they want because no matter what they do, the Americans will never attack them.”

Here’s a video below about North Korea’s crazy threats and how they kinda work:

So in the case of the unimaginable and the Stalinist North Koreans went full crazy and did try something, how does their military stack up?

With around 1.19 million personnel, and many more in the reserves, they’re big in size. Overall, its conventional forces are much bigger than what the South has, but they’re operating with obsolete equipment.

“North Korea remains reliant on a predominantly obsolescent equipment inventory across all three services,” says the International Institute for Strategic Studies, according to the UK’s The Telegraph.

North Korean defectors say soldiers also complain about not having enough food.

But the Huffington Post says that Seoul estimates North Korea has about 200,000 special forces, and they could cause huge damage if they were left to run amok.

“The special forces’ goal is to discourage both the United States and South Korea from fighting with North Korea at the earliest stage of war by putting major infrastructure, such as nuclear plants, and their citizens at risk,” said Kim Yeon-su, a professor at Korea National Defense University in Seoul to Huffington Post. “The North’s special forces are a key component of its asymmetric capabilities along with nuclear bombs, missiles, and artillery. Their job is to create as many battlefronts as possible to put their enemies in disarray.”

The North Koreans are also believed to have more than 13,000 artillery pieces, and its long-range batteries are capable of hitting the South’s capital Seoul, which is only 30 miles (50 kilometers) from the border.

Mobile artillery at a 2013 parade in North Korea. (Image: Flickr/Stefan Krasowski)

Mobile artillery at a 2013 parade in North Korea. (Image: Flickr/Stefan Krasowski)

If the North Koreans tried to relive 1950 and invade the South, they’ll also have to again deal with the American military. Currently, there’s just short of 30,000 American troops permanently based in the South.

But it would be the South and U.S.’s air advantage that would prove crucial.

“North Korea would not be able to prosecute a full-fledged war for very long,” Mark Fitzpatrick, a former U.S. State Department official, now with the International Institute for Strategic Studies, told the Huffington Post.

“Its biggest problem is that North Korea would quickly lose control of the skies because of the vastly superior (South Korean) and U.S. air forces,” he said. “The reported number of North Korean aircraft is meaningless, because many of them cannot fly, and North Korean pilots have little training in the air.”

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A U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor. In the case of war with North Korea, the U.S. Air Force would quickly show its dominance. (Image: Flickr/DVIDSHUB)

However, the biggest threat is North Korea’s nuclear arsenal. It is estimated that the North has 20 nuclear warheads that can be used on short and medium range missiles. They’re also trying to develop nuclear missiles capable of being sent by submarine, which  can’t be taken out by a preemptive attack.

The nuclear weapons are problematic for a range of reasons, and they’re at the very least a bargaining chip. But the big question is Pyongyang crazy enough to use them? Let’s just hope not.

For more on how crazy North Korea can get, see the video below:

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