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A Massive Underwater Ancient Greek City Has Been Discovered

The importance of our discovery is partly due to the large size of the establishment.
(Image: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain)
The importance of our discovery is partly due to the large size of the establishment. (Image: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain)

An ancient Greek city was discovered by archaeologists from the University of Geneva while they were conducting diver training off Lambayanna Beach in Greece’s Kiladha Bay. The city dates back to around 4,500 years (2,500 BC) and was approximately the size of 10 football fields; which covers an area of 12 acres.

International Business Times reported: “Archaeologists from the Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities, University of Geneva and the Swiss School of Archaeology found the fortified Bronze Age settlement in Khilada Bay, in the Argolic Gulf. They found at least three huge horseshoe-shaped foundations attached to the wall line – which they say was possibly part of towers used to defend the settlement.”

Remains of a street or wall at the Lambayanna site. (Image: University of Geneva)

Remains of a street or wall at the Lambayanna site.
(Image: University of Geneva)

Professor Julien Beck of the University of Geneva said: “The importance of our discovery is partly due to the large size of the establishment: at least 1.2 hectares (Ed. Note: 2.9 acres) were preserved,” He added that the discovery is important also because of the quantity and quality of the artifacts that were collected there,” reported Spero News.

According to History.com:

“Archaeologists found paved surfaces that appear to be streets, as well as a wide array of pottery and stone tools.

These include obsidian blades that the researchers say date to the Helladic period (3200 to 2050 B.C.), which archaeologists have divided into three phases. In all, the team has found more than 6,000 objects connected with the underwater settlement along the shoreline, making the site, in Beck’s words, “an archaeologist’s paradise.”

Hellenic Ministry of Culture, Education and Religious Affairs made the announcement on the find. The team of archaeologists had been looking for any prehistoric human activity on the eastern side of the Argolic Gulf. The city was submerged by three to nine feet below the surface. The find will be added to what we already know about the network of Bronze Age coastal settlements in the Argolic Gulf. It is hoped that the researchers can learn more about the daily life, trade, and shipping from the period.

A diver explores the site. (Image: University of Geneva)

A diver explores the site. (Image: University of Geneva)

“The city is thought to be typical layout of the time, with small buildings surrounded by fortified walls. Beck said another one was found in the nearby town of Lerna, which is mentioned in Greek mythology when Hercules had to battle the Hydra. The aquatic beast had its lair in the lake of Lerna and was supposed to be an entrance to the underworld, with Hydra serving as a guard,” according to IBT.

The archaeological operations began in July and ended in August of this year. It has been suggested that rising sea levels and the shifting of tectonic plates could be the cause of the city sinking below the sea thousands of years ago. But Beck and his colleagues have made no suggestion that the submerged city could be Atlantis; which is the mythical island that historians have searched for over two millenniums.

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