http://www.visiontimes.com/?p=84607

Taiji Dolphin Hunt Is on Again, Hundreds Are Expected to Be Killed

The dolphin hunt involves herding large numbers of dolphins and small whales into the secluded cove by using noise or nets and then they will try to capture or kill them. 
(Image: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain)
The dolphin hunt involves herding large numbers of dolphins and small whales into the secluded cove by using noise or nets and then they will try to capture or kill them. (Image: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain)

The famous Taiji hunt is known for all the wrong reasons; in the small Japanese port of Taiji hundreds of dolphins will be carolled into a secluded bay and then butchered, all for the sack of tradition.

The controversial six-month hunting season normally opens on the 1st of September every year, but this year it was delayed because of bad weather.

The Dolphin hunt involves herding large numbers of dolphins and small whales into the secluded cove, by using noise or nets and then they will try to capture or kill them. The annual hunt had drawn international attention after the documentary and Oscar-winning “The Cove,” offered viewers the disturbing process by using hidden and remotely operated cameras.

The Cove Film Trailer:

According to Sea Shepherd, hunters are using a killing technique that is known as “pithing;” this is where a metal rod is hammered into the spinal cord of the dolphins, causing paralysis. The dolphins remain conscious, breathing, and struggling as they and their families slowly die.

“We are hunting under the permission of the Japanese government and prefecture, and so we will continue to protect our fishermen and the methods. We will not quit,” said Taiji Mayor Kazutaka Sangen, wrote the Save Japan Dolphins.

The claims that are being made by the Japanese government to the media, and the public that this has been a part of their culture for centuries, is just simply not true says, Ric O’Barry, Director of Earth Island’s Dolphin Project.

“This claim of ‘Japanese tradition’ is nonsense,” he said, “The dolphin drive hunts, according to the town’s own written history, says a couple of drive hunts occurred in 1936 and 1944, but the current series of hunts only began in 1969.”

Save Japan Dolphins wrote: “we must continue to let Mayor Sangen and the Japanese governments know that until the drive killing and live capture of dolphins ends, the pressure both within and outside Japan will continue to grow.”

Taiji – The horror behind the curtain:

Sign this petition to intensify the pressure on Mayor Sangen and the Japanese government.

LIKE us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter.

What Is Travelling Really Like? Just Ask This Couple
Cute Thief Spotted: Wild Panda Sneaks Into a Bee Yard