http://www.visiontimes.com/?p=85408

How Nature’s Megaphone Amplifies Forest Beats

A forest megaphone acts as a bandstand. (Image: Tõnu Tunnel)
A forest megaphone acts as a bandstand. (Image: Tõnu Tunnel)

Architecture students from the Estonian Academy of the Arts have built three giant wooden megaphones and placed them in a forest for the public to enjoy.

Giant megaphone forest sound installation. (Image: Tõnu Tunnel)

Giant megaphone forest sound installation. (Image: Tõnu Tunnel)

The megaphones, which have a three-meter wide diameter, are carefully lined up to amplify and merge the natural forest sounds from each direction.

The installation can be used as a bandstand. It can also be used as a sitting and resting area for people walking in the forest. There is no electricity, so the megaphone is purely acoustic and unplugged.

Architecture students from the Estonian Academy of Arts building the megaphones. (Image: Tõnu Tunnel)

Architecture students from the Estonian Academy of Arts build the megaphone. (Image: Tõnu Tunnel)

Birgit Õigus came up with the idea, and it was realised with the help of her classmates Mariette Nõmm, Ardo Hiiuväin, Lennart Lind, Mariann Drell, Kertti Soots, Johanna Sepp, Sabine Suuster and Henri Kaarel Luht. The students were guided by designers from Derelict Furniture and architecture office b210.

The megaphone was built in Tallinn and transported to Võrumaa, Pähni Nature Centre for the public to enjoy.

Transporting the installation from Tallinn to Estonia’s Võru county. (Image: Tõnu Tunnel)

Transporting the installation from Tallinn to Estonia’s Võru county. (Image: Tõnu Tunnel)

Installing the wooden megaphones. (Image: Tõnu Tunnel)

Installing the wooden megaphones. (Image: Tõnu Tunnel)

Interacting with the installation. (Image: Tõnu Tunnel)

Interacting with the sound system. (Image: Tõnu Tunnel)

Author Valdur Mikita writes at length about how forests play such a big part in Estonian culture.

He praises the richness of the project, pointing out the design not only helps people notice the sounds of nature but also the silence: “It’s a place to listen, to browse the audible book of nature – there hasn’t really been a place like that in Estonia before.”

Group sitting in the installation. (Image: Tõnu Tunnel)

A group rests and enjoys what nature has to offer. (Image: Tõnu Tunnel)

Relaxing in nature to the natural sounds amplified. (Image: Tõnu Tunnel)

Relaxing and recharging in nature. (Image: Tõnu Tunnel)

Natural sounds are often underrated, and to experience this installation must be an incredible experience. The wooden structure looks so inviting to lay on.

Architecture is at it’s best when it works with nature.

This piece offers all a chance to ‘unplug’ from technology and become recharged again by nature — even if it’s just for a few hours.

Nature amplified. (Image: Tõnu Tunnel)

Nature amplified. (Image: Tõnu Tunnel)

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