http://www.visiontimes.com/?p=86761

See Australia’s Outback in a New Series called ‘Black As’

The skills of these young bush mechanics is incredible — they make the un-drivable, drivable. (Image:  Rebel Films via YouTube)
The skills of these young bush mechanics is incredible — they make the un-drivable, drivable. (Image: Rebel Films via YouTube)

East Arhnem Land in the Northern Territory, is just about as “outback and wild” as you’re going to get in Australia. But don’t take my word for it; see this country for yourself — through the eyes of the Black As crew — as they gallivant around the bush, riding in cars that should have long been retired.

A new reality TV show, staring the 'BlackAs' boys, Yolgnu Aboriginal men from Arnhem Land, Australia. (Image: Rebel Films via YouTube)

‘Black As’, a new reality TV show, stars Yolgnu Aboriginal men from Arnhem Land, Australia. (Image: Rebel Films via YouTube)

Black As is a new reality show with a difference.

In the same vein as the successful TV show Bush Mechanics, David Batty of Rebel Films, along with four young Yolgnu men, have released three pilots for the new series — which happens to be humorous and extremely captivating.

BlackAs Boys make a bridge from logs to cross a deep creek. (Image: Screenshot/Youtube)

The Yolgnu Aboriginal men  make a bridge for their car from logs. Do they make it? Watch episode 2. (Image: Rebel Films via Screenshot/YouTube)

Outback Australia through their eyes

While touring around with the Black As crew, crocodiles, snakes, and wild pigs as big as camper vans are just some of the fauna you see in this ancient setting. But it’s not just about deadly animals and driving impossible old cars; this show is also about looking into the lives of these young men who are still living a mostly traditional lifestyle — off the land.

After a long, hot and thirsty drive, the 'BlackAs' boys have a feast of mangrove worm. They are long and apparently delicious! -high in protein too, I expect. (Image: Youtube/screenshot)

After a long, hot, and thirsty drive, the ‘Black  As’ men have a feast of mangrove worms. The worms are long and apparently delicious! High in protein too, I expect. (Image: Rebel Films via Screenshot/YouTube)

David Batty puts the appeal of Black As down to the celebration of Aboriginal culture and people against the odds. With so many negative stories in the media about rural Aboriginal communities, it’s so refreshing — and important — to see young Aboriginal men as positive role models, eating healthy bush-tucker, connecting to their country, and speaking their mother tongue. Apart from all this, these men are living life and enjoying every moment of it — the energy and spirit is infectious!

Warning

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers should exercise caution when watching these programs, as they may contain images of deceased persons.

Watch the first episode called “The Mission“:

With no windscreen or windows, no bull-bar, no bonnet (Australian for hood), or seat belts, and a screwdriver to start the ignition, I can really believe that these young men were slightly inspired by the TV show Bush Mechanics, to say the least. In fact, they grew up watching it. As it turns out, they loved the show so much they wanted to make their own version.

The 'BlackAs' boys on a mission in their ramshackle car to get mangrove worm- bush tucker. (Image: Youtube/Screenshot)

The ‘Black As’ men are on a mission in their ramshackle car to get mangrove worm bush tucker. (Image: Rebel Films via YouTube/Screenshot)

So with the help of David Batty, and the Rebel Films crew, they have managed to shoot three short pilots, which can be seen on YouTube. According to The Guardian, there are currently another 25 episodes that have also been shot and are awaiting airplay.

Here is the second episode called Build A Bridge:

The Black As project was initially asking for financial support to make this series possible, and thanks to the generosity of the public, over $70, 000 has been raised. In the future, this small project will indirectly make a positive impact on the people living in rural Aboriginal communities, encouraging them to learn and embrace their cultural heritage with pride.

The third episode, called “The Worm Hunt” is well worth watching:

After watching the three pilots, I can’t wait to see more! Specifically, when, where, and how does the little white Suzuki eventually die? Apparently, it’s a timely event revealed in coming episodes.

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