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Family Amazed by Glasses That Instantly Cure Their Color Blind Sons

EnChroma glasses are shockingly good at restoring color vision. (Image: oplumb via flickr/ CC BY 2.0)
EnChroma glasses are shockingly good at restoring color vision. (Image: oplumb via flickr/ CC BY 2.0)

More and more color blind people are shocked at seeing accurate color for the first time. A new type of glasses has caused an eruption of happiness among color blind people.

The two brothers in the video find out just how much they missed living in a world without color. A new set of glasses that they share between them soon changes the way they see the world around them, and leaves them emotional beyond measure.

EnChroma color blindness glasses seem like more than a simple modern day miracle.

Having two color blind sons and giving them one pair of glasses makes sense when you see the prices on EnChroma’s website. The glasses aren’t incredibly expensive, especially when compared to hearing aids and other such devices, but if you have to buy more than one pair for a condition that afflicts several people in a family, it can get expensive.

EnChroma glasses are designed for people with red-green color blindness. There are different types of color blindness, but not being able to see reds and greens is the most common.

Some people have rather mild color blindness, while others are much more severe, and it can vary anywhere in between. Men are by far more susceptible.

It’s because genetically, color blindness affects the X chromosome, of which women have two and men only have one. Therefore, for every 1 out of 200 women who are color blind, 1 out of 12 men are.

Color blindness is usually a genetic thing, but it can sometimes be the result of aging, medication, or disease. Any color that has even a bit of red or green in it will be hard to distinguish, but on the other hand, it can be a benefit.

Color blind people are sometimes able to more easily distinguish shapes. They aren’t tricked or distracted by color, and can sometimes see camouflage more easily, which has proved useful for military purposes.

The EnChroma lenses work by reversing the effects of the red-green confusion that goes on inside the eyes of color blind people. It filters out the colors that occur when the sensors that pick up reds and greens overlap. In that way, it creates color clarity.

As CNBC reports, EnChroma eyewear started out as an accident. A doctor in Glass Science discovered an even better use for the coating he used for eye surgery protective goggles.

He noticed how it changed the color of the light, and decided to explore it more. After clinical tests, Dr. Don McPherson and Andrew Schmeder founded EnChroma Inc. in 2010.

Their first eyewear came out in 2012, and then in 2014 it gained acceptance by the optical community. Despite all the advances made thus far in their products, they hope to continue developing the technology to help color blind people see.

Despite the excitement of the brothers in the video, EnChroma doesn’t truly cure the problem. It provides a temporary fix. Of course it’s the best solution now on the market. To truly get rid of color blindness would require getting deep into someone’s eyes and changing the way they were built, and the technology just isn’t there yet. That also would be an extremely invasive measure compared to just throwing on some moderately priced specialized glasses.

As MIT Technology Review reports, there is indeed a scientist out there trying to fix the genetic issue that causes color blindness. So far, he has experimented on monkeys.

Professor Jay Neitz is seeking to take his monkey findings and start trials on humans.

EnChroma is currently the only mass marketed product of its type, though there are other doctors custom making their own color blindness lenses for people. Some professions require passing color blindness tests, and EnChroma currently is not recommended for such purposes.

Despite its current deficiencies, its availability and effectiveness speak for themselves.

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