Chinese Culture Today: Living in Communist China Can Be Very Difficult

The Chinese people face many difficulties today. (Image: Gauthier DELECROIX - 郭天 via flickr / CC BY 2.0)
The Chinese people face many difficulties today. (Image: Gauthier DELECROIX - 郭天 via flickr / CC BY 2.0)

The corrupt nature of Chinese culture today has led to great difficulties for many Chinese people.

Giving birth is difficult

The generation of people who were born after the 1980s are beginning to have their babies. With the arrival of this baby-boom, maternity beds at hospitals are hard to get. Not only do these beds need to be booked months in advance, they can only be held for a few days around the due-date. Inside the crowded hospital corridors, expectant mothers and their families wait for a progression check.

Raising children is difficult

A recent survey by a research and consulting firm claims that in Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, and other cities where financial expenditure is high, only high earning couples — each with an income above 8,000 yuan — can afford to have children.

Feeding infants and young children is difficult

Chinese Culture Today graduate

Data shows that in 2010, 6.3 million Chinese university graduates had to wait to secure employment. (lian xiaoxiao via flickr / CC BY-SA 2.0)

While consumer confidence in China’s milk powder industry was collapsing, one foreign milk powder company took the opportunity to become the “voice” of the milk industry. The imported milk is more expensive though, and the cost is raised frequently.

Getting into a good preschool is difficult

When speaking to parents in China, many complain about how hard it is to get their child into a decent kindergarten; some parents feel it’s harder than being admitted into college. Presently, in Beijing, Shanghai, Guangdong Province, Jiangxi Province, and other places, there is an emerging social phenomenon related to how difficult kindergarten enrollment is.

College is difficult

China has a considerable number of college students, yet no significant university that cultivates outstanding students. “Why have our universities failed to cultivate outstanding talent?” This is a famous question posed by Qian Xuesen, a distinguished scientist who graduated from the California Institute of Technology. He was the founder of China’s space industry.

Finding a job is difficult

Data shows that in 2010, 6.3 million Chinese university graduates had to wait to secure employment; in 2009, the number of students was 6.11 million, the employment rate was 68 percent, and the number of unemployed people was 1.96 million.

Migrant workers’ lives are difficult

Early in 2010, the “new generation of migrant workers” was frequently brought to light in the media. The migrant workers from rural regions had three obstacles that were identified — difficulty finding employment, difficulty integrating into city life, and difficulty upholding their basic rights. These three factors continue to plague migrant workers in China.

Because of the existence of the urban-rural dual system, farmers pay significantly more in social security, education and other services than their urban counterparts.

Because of the existence of the urban-rural dual system, farmers pay significantly more in social security, education, and other services than their urban counterparts. (Image: DaiLuo via flickr / CC BY 2.0)

Farmers’ lives are difficult

Because of the existence of the urban-rural dual system, farmers pay significantly more in social security, education, and other services than their urban counterparts.

Affording household necessities is difficult

In 2010, the word “inflation” repeatedly hit upon the fragile nerves of the Chinese people. The price of everyday necessities, such as petrol, vegetables, milk powder, medicine, electricity, water, liquor, and flour, are all on the rise. The only thing that is not on the rise is people’s wages.

Getting married is difficult

Presently in China, the sex ratio of under 19-year-old’s is seriously out of balance. In 2020, the number of males who will be at an age to marry will be 24 million more than the number of females of the same age. Therefore, China is expecting to see a phenomenon where tens of millions of young men will face the difficult issue of trying to pair up with a young woman.

This grossly unbalanced population has come about because of the controversial “one-child policy” enforced by the Chinese Communist Party. Families usually have one go at having a child, and they traditionally prefer a male child. Abortions are performed by choice to ensure that male fetuses are carried to full-term and female fetuses are not.

Waste management is difficult

One media group reported that more than one third of China’s cities are being besieged by garbage. Another data source indicated that with the exception of rural areas, among 668 cities in China, two-thirds of them are surrounded by garbage and one-quarter of them have no landfills. Typically, in the space surrounding the various cities, dumped garbage covers more than 190 square miles.

Telling the truth is difficult

Above all, telling the truth is the most important factor missing in China today among the people. The rapid development of Chinese society as a whole has seen the development of a lack of trust and good faith in the community. The people no longer trust the communist authorities.

Chinese Culture Today couple

The grossly unbalanced male-female ratio has come about because of the controversial ‘one-child policy’ enforced by the Chinese Communist Party. (i a walsh via flickr / CC BY 2.0)

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