Survey Shows Hong Kong Youth Favor Hong Kong Over China

City of Hong Kong (Barbara Willi/Flickr)
City of Hong Kong. (Image: Barbara Willi via flickr / CC BY 2.0 )

After returning to Chinese sovereignty nearly 20 years ago, only one third of those between 18 and 29 years old think of themselves as being Chinese, according to a survey that has been periodically conducted by Hong Kong University (HKU) during the past 20 years. The number of Hong Kong youth who do not want to be associated with the Chinese communist government is at record low levels in recent years.

Zhou Ke-Ai was born in 1997. When she was 11 years old, the 2008 Beijing Olympic games made quite an impact on her. She was awed by the 48 gold medals won by Chinese athletes. That made her proud to be Chinese. In 2014, Zhou was arrested for participating in the umbrella revolution in Hong Kong. When asked if she considers herself to be Chinese now, her answer is a definite no.

According to Yahoo News, this year the HKU survey interviewed 10 young people who were born in 1997. Nine were born in Hong Kong and one was an immigrant from Mainland China. All of them considered themselves to be Hongkongers and felt more passionate about Hong Kong than China.

Young people in Hong Kong are offended by the Chinese communist regime. Police were sent to Hong Kong to secretly arrest bookshop owners. Three were imprisoned in Mainland China because they sold books about the inside story of the Chinese Communist Party.

The Communist Party has already eroded the rule of law in Hong Kong to some degree. These incidents affirm the attitude of young people against the Chinese communist government. They don’t want to be known as citizens of Mainland China.

The news reports that more and more young people like Zhou are willing to join in campaigns to fight for democracy. They call for China to live up to its promise of “Hong Kong people ruling Hong Kong” so that a true universal suffrage can be realized in Hong Kong.

Like this article? Subscribe to our weekly email for more! 

Chinese Vs. Western Media
China’s Growing Rich Spell Trouble for the Country