Trump’s Use of Certain Phrases Are Popular on the Internet

(Image: Shealah Craighead [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons)
(Image: Shealah Craighead [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons)

“If you have a name, you might as well have a nickname.” When it comes to nicknames, President Trump has seldom been known to hand out only one or two.

It’s not just the nicknames that some people often find amusing or inappropriate, it might very well be the entire character that such nicknames imply.

The following example illustrates the American head of state’s use of nicknames. Donald Trump called Hillary Clinton a “liar” during the final presidential debate — after she brought up comments he made on television in April, according to the Independent’s article on what Mrs. Clinton was called by Mr. Trump in an interview.

The two sides of the coin

Trump supporters, on the one hand, believe that he has brought “an unusual rhetorical style to his office.” The words and phrases he invented or popularized, together with his aides – many have become part 0f the language.

However, the same casual and seemingly indifferent use of language has more than once put Trump under scrutiny from those who disagree with his general stance on diplomacy.

Not too long ago, the BBC, writing about Trump’s choice of words when expressing his opinion about migrants, claimed: “The White House did not deny he used a slur and a UN official condemned the remark as racist.”

The news further stated: “U.S. President Donald Trump has reportedly lashed out at immigrants in a foul-mouthed Oval office outburst that a UN spokesman later condemned (…).”

The debate about the ethical code of behavior for a head of state is a very profound one and might go on for quite some time.

The amplifying power of trend and the Internet

(Image Credit: Geralt;Pixabay;CC0 1.0

Some believe the modification of Twitter’s abuse rules could be in part motivated by Trump’s way of using it. (Image: GeraltPixabayCC0 1.0)

Who doesn’t remember the media speaking about Twitter and how controversial the use of its tweets are when it comes to people in high positions, or a president using it to amplify their personal opinions.

Many debates circle around the question of whether a person in such a lofty position, involved in state affairs, should be allowed to express their own opinion on social media.

Some believe the modification of Twitter’s abuse rules could be in part motivated by Trump’s way of using it. However, the tightening of abuse rules is also geared toward accounts that post hateful images, language, or symbols.

The Metro said in an article about Twitter’s new, strict abuse rules: “New strict Twitter abuse rules may finally silence Donald Trump. Twitter is now enforcing stricter policies on violent and abusive content, like hateful images or symbols, including those attached to user profiles.”

However, according to statements made by the Business Insider, the new abuse policy introduced by Twitter in December of 2017 “virtually exempts Trump from punishment on the platform.”

The questions and ethical debates unleashed regarding what people may say on Twitter or other social media platforms like Facebook have become quite a widely discussed subject — especially on the Internet.

Unfortunately, due to the entertainment status the Internet has gained, its content becomes ever more bearable with time. After a while, people might get less sensitive to what is going on out there.

Shealah Craighead [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Things that before would have made them jump out of their seat with a cry of outrage today might only irritate them ever so slightly, no different than the aggressive plot and scenery of an action movie on TV or Netflix. (Image: Shealah Craighead [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons)

Things that before would have made them jump out of their seat with a cry of outrage today might only irritate them ever so slightly, no different than the aggressive plot and scenery of an action movie on TV or Netflix.

It’s all coming out of the same screen. How seriously do people really take what is coming out of that screen? How reliable is the information, news, and event coverage coming out of that screen? These are questions that have been polarizing the netizens for some time now.

The following are a sample of some words and phrases that netizens deemed popular. These words and phrases are not necessarily new, but have recently been made very popular due to their unique use by either Trump, his team, his supporters, or his opposition.

Trump’s most popularized words and phrases

Apparently, the American President follows a daily morning routine. He usually gets up at 5 a.m. and then skims through the major events that occurred in America and around the world. This is his period of time where he prepares for what is to come on that day.

  • Sad!

In Trump’s tweets, while he accuses somebody or expresses his anger, he uses “sad” at the end.  With the limited number of characters for a tweet, he uses the word to explicitly express his political attitude.

  • Big or big league

The phrase originated during the first TV debate between Trump and Hillary in 2016. On the issue of tax cuts, Trump said that he wanted to implement a big cut. People don’t really know which phrase Trump used: Was it Bigly? or big league?

Regardless, “bigly or big league” became a hot-word overnight, searched by Americans.

  • Braggadocios

In the same TV debate, Trump also used the word “braggadocios” to state the misunderstanding of people towards him. A dictionary defines the word as “praising yourself or speaking too proudly about your own achievements or importance.” The word was popular in the 19th century, but is seldom used today. After the debate, the word suddenly became the top of the web search list.

  • Alternative Facts

Used by Kellyanne Conway, a counselor to Trump, during a Meet the Press interview on January 22, 2017, the phrase describes

an explicit lying. It is implicit with very clear meaning so that it quickly became Americans’ favor.

  • MAGA

This is an acronym of Trump’s campaign slogan, “Make America Great Again.” The word has been widely mentioned with the slogan and has become the hope and the pride of many Americans.

  • Fake news

The phrase is the most frequently used by Trump, and it has appeared at least 103 times in Trump’s tweets. It is now widely used in America.

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