Quality of Life Under China’s Economic Boom

China's economy has undergone tremendous changes; however, with this growth, the quality of life of individuals has eroded with the changing times.  (Image:  pixabay  /  CC0 1.0)
China's economy has undergone tremendous changes; however, with this growth, the quality of life of individuals has eroded with the changing times. (Image: pixabay / CC0 1.0)

China’s economy has undergone tremendous changes; however, with this growth, the quality of life of individuals has eroded with the changing times. Quality of life is the general well-being of individuals and societies, outlining negative and positive features of life. It observes life satisfaction, including everything from physical health, family, education, employment, wealth, religious beliefs, finance, and the environment. Here are some quality of life issues that have suffered in recent years under China’s strong growth.

Thanksgiving

Ok, so the Chinese never had it, but they used to have something similar, and it wasn’t just an annual event. The ancient Chinese believed: “If receiving a drop of water, one would repay with a spring.” Today, only money matters.

Faith

In the past Chinese officials would give up their lives in order to better their country. Citizens believed in heaven and hell, and feared retribution. Nowadays, people have no faith, no reverence, and don’t know what is the true purpose of their daily toil.

Citizens believed in heaven and hell, and feared retribution. (Image: via pixabay / CC0 1.0)

Citizens believed in heaven and hell, and feared retribution. (Image: via pixabay / CC0 1.0)

Ethics

There’s a general lack integrity. Vegetables laced with excessive pesticides, toxic rice, and other products are widespread. Like a naughty child, bad behavior hasn’t been punished.

Self-confidence

Even though China is now the second largest economy, its environmental pollution, food security, human rights, and political issues are untrusted globally, making citizens less confident.

Good health

Approximately 60 percent of Chinese adults have hyperglycemia, while another 60 percent have hepatitis. Countless more are realizing the consequences of polluted air, water, and soil on their long-term health.

Water helps when you have a cold or flu. (Image: pixabay / CC0 1.0)

Countless more are realizing the consequences of polluted air, water, and soil on their long-term health. (Image: pixabay / CC0 1.0)

Good sleep

Sleep disorders among the youth are growing. Over 56 percent of Chinese believe that pressure from work affects their sleep, and 55 percent need medication to help them sleep.

Personal space

For Chinese, pressure from constant over work without healthy breaks is so great that if young white-collar workers do not die from exhaustion, they are grateful.

Love

Marriage rate down, divorce rate up as more Chinese couples say I don’t or I won’t anymore. According to figures released recently by the Ministry of Civil Affairs, the divorce rate doubled in the decade through 2016 from 1.46 to three. The number of couples who actually divorced last year rose 8.3 percent from 2015 to 4.2 million, the ministry said.

Innocence

Li Zhi, a thinker from the Ming Dynasty, once said: “Innocence is what we are. If we lose our innocence, we lose our hearts; if we lose our hearts, we lose reality.”

Research by Felice

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