No Food From Me

A person talks to a father and his son. (Image: Bernadette Wolf / Vision Times)
A person talks to a father and his son. (Image: Bernadette Wolf / Vision Times)

A father and a son lived separately for several years. The son saved up some money. The father was old and sick. He could not make money, so he became a beggar.

One day, the father went past his son’s house. The acquaintance pointed to the father and said to the son: “This man must not be your father, else how can you not care for him?” The son said: “I am his son. It is good enough that I no longer need him to prepare my food. How should I provide him his own meal?”

Doctor Shi commented: “Although there is no one as cruel as the son in the story, there are many who do not respect their elderly even though they provide food for them.”

‘Good Laughs’ meant to nourish a good heart with stories. (Image: Bernadette Wolf / Vision Times)

‘Good Laughs’ is meant to nourish a good heart with stories. (Image: Bernadette Wolf / Vision Times)

About Good Laughs

Good Laughs (笑得好) is a collection of short stories edited by Chinese doctor Cheng-Jin Shi (石成金) of the Qing Dynasty (1636-1912). This collection can be considered as the Chinese version of Aesop’s Fables. Dr. Shi was believed to have lived between the Kangxi and early Qianlong reigns. He also authored many other books on remedies for life and health.

Good Laughs is meant to nourish the heart with stories. In the preface, Dr. Shi wrote: “People are entertained by being sarcastic; I inspire people with sarcasm. It entertains the heart, but it can also save a life like acupuncture.”

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