Why the Chinese Way of Drinking Hot Water Is Good for You

Foreigners are often fascinated by the Chinese obsession with drinking hot water. (Image:  pixabay /  CC0 1.0)
Foreigners are often fascinated by the Chinese obsession with drinking hot water. (Image: pixabay / CC0 1.0)

Foreigners are often fascinated by the Chinese obsession with drinking hot water. Even when the temperature is smoldering hot, most Chinese would rather drink hot water than cold. To understand this practice, we must look at ancient Chinese medical knowledge.

A Chinese health habit

Chinese medical systems have long held the view that drinking hot water is good for health. In fact, people are advised to drink a glass of hot water early in the morning to trigger their digestive processes. While eating meals, cold water was strictly prohibited since the meal itself was served hot. Plus, consuming items of two opposite temperatures was seen as bad for the body. On the other hand, cold water is said to slow down the functions of the internal organs. This is also one of the reasons why drinking hot water was advised by Chinese traditional medicine.

Benefits of drinking hot water

Drinking hot water has scientifically been proven to be highly beneficial to the human body. The first benefit is in the ease of digestion. The warmth of the water triggers the digestive tract, lubricating it well enough that the entire digestive process carries on smoothly. And since the water is hot, it is better able to disintegrate food inside the digestive tract while also helping in removing waste. In contrast, drinking cold water during meals will only lead to a hardening of the oils present in the food, thereby paving the way for a fat deposit along the intestines.

 Chinese medical systems have long held the view that drinking hot water is good for health. (Image: pixabay / CC0 1.0)

Chinese medical systems have long held the view that drinking hot water is good for health. (Image: pixabay / CC0 1.0)

For people suffering from nasal congestion, hot water is again a friend. The mucus buildup would have created an irritating sore throat. By drinking hot water, the sore throat can be smoothened. Plus, if the person is suffering from sinus or headaches, they just need to inhale the vapors of the hot water for some relief.

For people suffering from problems with blood circulation, drinking hot water will definitely help them deal with the issue. Because of the warmth of the water, the fat deposits in the body get dissolved and eliminated. The toxins circulating in the body is also flushed out. As a consequence, blood flow will improve.

A big benefit of drinking hot water that very few nutritionists talk about is that it can actually help with weight loss. In case you are planning a diet, consider drinking a cup of warm water first thing in the morning. This will raise the temperature of the body, together with the metabolism rate. As a result, the body burns off more calories. In addition, the kidneys will also function better if you drink hot water.

To lose or not to lose—weight is a popular topic these days. Either you want to gain some pounds, or lose them. (Image: via pixabay / CC0 1.0)

A big benefit of drinking hot water that very few nutritionists talk about is that it can actually help with weight loss. (Image: via pixabay / CC0 1.0)

And for those who are obsessed with combating aging, try drinking hot water whenever possible. Since warm water is known to remove toxins from the body, the quality of the body increases. Plus, it also promotes skin elasticity. Eventually, people will be able to maintain a younger face by opting for drinking hot water instead of cold.

Given such a wide range of benefits of drinking hot water, it should be easy to understand why following such a habit will contribute to a healthier body. The Chinese are known to drink hot water early in the morning and 20 minutes before each meal. And that is something that you should definitely try out for better health.

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