New Evidence Reveals How Heavy Elements Were Created After the Big Bang

Researchers Professor Snezhana Abarzhi and Ms. Annie Naveh from UWA’s School of Mathematical Sciences conducted a mathematical analysis of the conditions that were created from a supernova.  (Image: via   pixabay  /  CC0 1.0)
Researchers Professor Snezhana Abarzhi and Ms. Annie Naveh from UWA’s School of Mathematical Sciences conducted a mathematical analysis of the conditions that were created from a supernova. (Image: via pixabay / CC0 1.0)

The Big Bang theory and the question of how life on Earth began has fascinated scientists for decades, but new research from The University of Western Australia suggests the conditions that resulted from the Big Bang are different to what we thought.

The Big Bang theory, developed in 1927, is considered the most credible scientific explanation of how the Universe was created. It suggests that through a process of expansion and explosion, hydrogen gas was created, which led to the formation of stars, and their death (supernova) led to the creation of life.

Researchers Professor Snezhana Abarzhi and Ms. Annie Naveh from UWA’s School of Mathematical Sciences conducted a mathematical analysis of the conditions that were created from a supernova. Professor Abarzhi said although the supernova explosion was violent, it wasn’t as turbulent and quick as previously thought, adding:

Professor Abarzhi said it was fascinating to see the complexity of how the Universe might have been formed, saying:

Provided by: University of Western Australia [Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.]

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