US military and Its Massive Carbon Footprint

The US Military's climate policy is fundamentally contradictory — confronting the effects of climate change while remaining the largest single institutional consumer of hydrocarbons in the world.  (Image: via   pixabay  /  CC0 1.0)
The US Military's climate policy is fundamentally contradictory — confronting the effects of climate change while remaining the largest single institutional consumer of hydrocarbons in the world. (Image: via pixabay / CC0 1.0)

The U.S. military’s carbon footprint is enormous and must be confronted in order to have a substantial effect on battling global warming. Research by social scientists from Durham University and Lancaster University shows the U.S. military is one of the largest climate polluters in history, consuming more liquid fuels and emitting more CO2e (carbon-dioxide equivalent) than most countries.

The majority of greenhouse gas (GHG) accounting routinely focuses on civilian energy use and fuel consumption, not on the U.S. military. This new study, published in Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, calculates part of the U.S. military’s impact on climate change through critical analysis of its global logistical supply chains.

Despite the recent increase in attention, the US military’s dependence on fossil fuels is unlikely to change. The US is continuing to pursue open-ended operations around the globe, with the life-cycles of existing military aircraft and warships locking them into hydrocarbons for years to come. (Image: via pixabay / CC0 1.0)

Despite the recent increase in attention, the U.S. military’s dependence on fossil fuels is unlikely to change. The U.S. is continuing to pursue open-ended operations around the globe, with the life-cycles of existing military aircraft and warships locking them into hydrocarbons for years to come. (Image: via pixabay / CC0 1.0)

The research provides an independent public assessment of the U.S. military’s greenhouse gas emissions. It reports that if the U.S. military were a nation state, it would be the 47th largest emitter of GHG in the world, if only taking into account the emissions from fuel usage. Report co-author Dr. Patrick Bigger, of Lancaster University Environment Centre, said:

Despite the recent increase in attention, the U.S. military’s dependence on fossil fuels is unlikely to change. The US is continuing to pursue open-ended operations around the globe, with the life-cycles of existing military aircraft and warships locking them into hydrocarbons for years to come.

This study brings transparency to one of the world’s largest institutional consumers of hydrocarbons at a time when the issue is a hot-button topic on the US Presidential campaign trail. (Image: via pixabay / CC0 1.0)

This study brings transparency to one of the world’s largest institutional consumers of hydrocarbons at a time when the issue is a hot-button topic on the U.S. presidential campaign trail. (Image: via pixabay / CC0 1.0)

The research comes at a time when the U.S. military is preparing for climate change through both its global supply networks and its security infrastructure. This study brings transparency to one of the world’s largest institutional consumers of hydrocarbons at a time when the issue is a hot-button topic on the U.S. presidential campaign trail.

Leading Democratic candidates, such as Senator Elizabeth Warren, are asking critical questions of the role of the U.S. military in climate change and examining its plans for the future. Co-author Dr. Benjamin Neimark, Associate Director of the Pentland Centre for Sustainability in Business at Lancaster, said:

Co-author Dr. Oliver Belcher, of Durham University’s Department of Geography, said:

The researchers’ examination of the U.S. military’s “carbon boot-print” started with the U.S. Defense Logistics Agency — Energy (DLA-E), a powerful yet virtually unresearched sub-agency within the larger Defense Logistics Agency.

The Air Force is by far the largest emitter of GHG at more than 13,000 kt CO2e, almost double that of the US Navy’s 7,800 kt CO2e. In addition to using the most polluting types of fuel, the Air Force and Navy are also the largest purchasers of fuel. (Image: via pixabay / CC0 1.0)

The Air Force is by far the largest emitter of GHG at more than 13,000 kt CO2e, almost double that of the US Navy’s 7,800 kt CO2e. In addition to using the most polluting types of fuel, the Air Force and Navy are also the largest purchasers of fuel. (Image: via pixabay / CC0 1.0)

It is the primary purchase-point for hydrocarbon-based fuels for the U.S. Military, and a powerful actor in the global oil market, with the fuels it delivers powering everything from routine base operations in the USA to forward operating bases in Afghanistan. Dr. Neimark added:

Other key findings of the report include:

  • In 2017 alone, the U.S. military purchased about 269,230 barrels of oil a day and emitted more than 25,000 kt CO2e by burning those fuels. In 2017 alone, the Air Force purchased $4.9 billion worth of fuel and the Navy $2.8 billion, followed by the Army at $947 million and Marines at $36 million.
  • If the U.S. military were a country, it would nestle between Peru and Portugal in the global league table of fuel purchasing, when comparing 2014 World Bank country liquid fuel consumption with 2015 U.S. military liquid fuel consumption.
  • For 2014, the scale of emissions was roughly equivalent to the total — not just fuel — emissions from Romania. According to the DLA-E data obtained by the researchers, which includes GHG emissions from direct or stationary sources, indirect or mobile sources, and electricity use, and other indirect, including upstream and downstream emissions.
  • The Air Force is by far the largest emitter of GHG at more than 13,000 kt CO2e, almost double that of the US Navy’s 7,800 kt CO2e. In addition to using the most polluting types of fuel, the Air Force and Navy are also the largest purchasers of fuel.

Provided by: Lancaster University [Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.]

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