The Most Memorable Moments Amid Hong Kong Protests (Part 2)

As Hong Kong’s anti-extradition demonstrations persist, more unforgettable moments continue to emerge. (Image: NTDTV)
As Hong Kong’s anti-extradition demonstrations persist, more unforgettable moments continue to emerge. (Image: NTDTV)

As Hong Kong’s anti-extradition demonstrations persist, more unforgettable moments continue to emerge. We shared the first set of five most memorable moments recently and we are now sharing with you the second set of five most memorable moments.

Moment 6:  Creative Arts Carry Hong Kong’s Voices

By now, most people know that a trademark of the Hong Kong protests is they are leaderless. In the last 12 weeks, small- to large-scale protests have been mobilized by individual protesters’ own initiatives and coordinated through the means of social media and the dissemination of creative protest arts.

The protest arts have exhibited mature ideas and ingenuity. They inspire, inform, and carry the voices of the Hong Kong people in their defiance of the totalitarian authority of the Chinese Community Party (CCP), the Hong Kong government, and the police brutality.

The post below showed two photos side by side illustrating violence against the protesters committed by both the white shirt triad members and the police. It drew parallels to the conduct of the triad members and the police, and implied collusion between the two groups.

Moment 7: Popstar Ho Wan-see spoke at the United Nations

Hong Kong’s Pop singer Ho Wan-see (Denise Ho) gave a speech at the United Nations (UN) Human Rights Council in Switzerland on July 8. She alleged that the actions of the CCP and Hong Kong government have jeopardized Hong Kong’s freedom and human rights, and violated the premises of “one country, two systems.”  She urged the UN to remove China from the United Nations Human Rights Council based on China’s record of human rights violations.

In the short 90-second speech, Wan-see was interrupted twice by the CCP representative who revealed to the world its arrogance and disrespect toward the speaker as it did to the Hong Kong people.

Moment 8: Actors and singers joined the protest

One of Hong Kong’s well-known actresses, Ye Dejun, now 71 years old, routinely participated in the demonstrations to lend her support to the fight of the young people. She expressed her gratitude to the young protesters and encouraged them: “You have done nothing wrong, kudos to what you have done. You’ve awakened us that if we have done something wrong, we need to correct ourselves.”

Actor Wong Chau-sang and Singer Wong Yiu-Ming were among a handful of celebrities who stood up to the anti-extradition law, while the rest of the entertainment industry remains silent fearing repercussions of losing the huge market in mainland China. The actions of these courageous celebrities illuminated Hong Kong’s darkest hours with their star power and humanity.

Moment 9: Taiwan supported Hong Kong

A number of cities in Taiwan launched fundraising activities to procure “used helmets” for the demonstrators in Hong Kong

In Taipei, more than 10,000 people held a rally to support the people of Hong Kong and their rejection to follow Hong Kong’s footsteps in the CCP’s rule of “one country, two systems,” as the CCP has proven its untrustworthiness.

Both Hong Kong and Taiwan are small in size, but they share the common values of freedom, democracy, human rights, and the rule of law. Today, as Hong Kong people’s rights are under siege, Taiwan people understand that if they don’t lend their support, Taiwan will become CCP’s next target.

Moment 10: All sectors urge the Hong Kong government to respond to the people’s demands

The anti-extradition fight has gained widespread support from both the public and private sectors in Hong Kong. One hundred and five open letters have been issued requesting the Hong Kong government to respond to the people’s five major demands. These letters included several from the heads and employees of government departments, and most recently, 3,800 accountants initiated a joint request to call for the Chief Executive of Hong Kong, Carrie Lam, to respond to the public’s demands.

Translated by Chua BC and edited by Angela

Original Chinese version can be found at https://www.ntdtv.com/b5/2019/08/05/a102637644.html

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