On With Her Head! Taiwanese Seek to Save 4,000-Year-Old Rock Formation

A rock formation called the Queen's Head in Taiwan. (David Monniaus/left, Alton Thompson/right)
A rock formation called the Queen's Head in Taiwan. (David Monniaus/left, Alton Thompson/right)

The tourism bureau in Taipei is carrying out experiments to prevent the iconic Queen’s Head rock from eroding beyond repair.

Thought to be about 4,000 years old, the formation got its name after the profile of Queen Elizabeth I who reigned in England in the 16th century.

Her circumference is currently shrinking by almost an inch a year, and her neck could break within 10 years, according to Focus Taiwan.

Specialists are injecting nearby rocks with nano-sealants to quadruple their hardness, and make them typhoon- and quake-resistant. However, the aesthetic effects are unknown, except they will no longer change color with the seasons.

The test rocks will be monitored for a year to decide which technique to use on the Queen’s Head. A local survey found respondents in favor of artificially preserving the landmark, triggering the bureau to find a solution rather than let it erode away.

Siberian Elders Vote to Rebury 2,500-Year-Old Mummy With Angry Spirit to Prevent More Disasters
It's the Perfect Time for Hiking in the Beautiful USA: National Scenic Trails Map and Hiking Tips