Watch Bill Gates Drink Filtered Human Waste Sludge!

In this video from the Gates Foundation, Bill Gates drinks water that has been filtered from human waste. How is it filtered? That’s where genius engineer Peter Janicki comes in. Janicki invented a machine that filters human waste into useable electricity and clean drinking water!

This prototype processor in Washington seeks to change the way developing countries process their waste. Image: Screenshot/Youtube

This prototype processor in Washington seeks to change the way developing countries process their waste. (Screenshot/Youtube)

 

The invention is called the Janicki-OmniProcessor, and its concept is rather simple. Sewage is pumped from a local sewage facility into the prototype machine in Washington state.

The machine then turns that sewer sludge into pathogen-free clean drinking water, electricity, and ash.

The sludge enters the machine and goes up a large conveyor belt into the “dryer” where the sludge is then boiled. In the boiler process, they separate the water vapor from the solids.

The sludge moves up the belt into the dryer where it is boiled. Image: Screenshot/Youtube

The sludge moves up the belt into the dryer where it is boiled. (Screenshot/Youtube)

After the water vapor and the solids are separated, the solids are dry and go into the fire to act as fuel. It is converted into high pressure/high temperature steam that then goes into a steam engine and creates power or electricity. The water vapor that is created in the boiling process is run through a cleaning station, which creates drinkable water.

The Gates Foundation hopes to expand this machine into developing countries like India and Africa. They claim that each

$1.5 million plant can process sewage from a community of 100,000 people.

The potential benefits of this invention are huge, as 40 percent of the global population (2.5 billion people) lack adequate sanitation, and an additional 2.1 billion people use facilities that aren’t able to safely dispose of human waste. The OmniProcessor can solve these problems because it generates its own electricity wherever it’s located.

The team will travel to Senegal next month to rebuild the OmniProcessor and test it in a developing nation.

 

 

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