Watch the Impact We Have on Earth From Space

5 human activities you can see from space. (Screenshot/YouTube)
5 human activities you can see from space. (Screenshot/YouTube)

How much impact are we having on the environment? NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey’s Landsat satellite program have provided us with a view from space over a time period of just 40 years.

After watching the video, you soon discover that we leave quite a mark.

The Landsat satellite program mission is to provide repetitive acquisition of high resolution multi-spectral data of the Earth’s surface on a global basis, and is still the only source of global, calibrated, high spatial resolution measurements of the Earth’s surface that can be compared to previous data records.

The table lists the key mission characteristics of the Landsat Program. A detailed Landsat Program Chronology is also available. Image: NASA

The table lists the key mission characteristics of the Landsat Program. A detailed Landsat Program Chronology is also available. (Image: NASA)

The data from the Landsat spacecraft constitute the longest record of the Earth’s continental surfaces as seen from space. It is a record unmatched in quality, detail, coverage, and value, wrote NASA.

In the video, the photos were taken over 40 years, and clearly show the impact of just five human activities on the Earth, and what it shows is a real eye opener.

From the shocking deforestation of Rondônia, Brazil, (where the area’s global beef exports have mowed down enough trees to fill the state of West Virginia), to the rampant water use in the Aral Sea causing a loss of 60,000 fishery jobs due to rising salt levels, wrote Care2.

5 human activities you can see from space:

They went on to say: You’ll also see how the dirty energy industry has literally stripped away Wyoming’s natural resources, and how much the Larsen B Ice Shelf has collapsed due to climate change. In the video above, notice how the increasing number of golf courses and artificial lakes in rapidly growing Las Vegas are an ironic harbinger of the area’s relentless drought.

It’s clear that we are having a huge impact on Mother Earth. The question is, how can we turn this around—or can we?

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