Do You Know Where China’s Taxes Go?

China’s newly rich gentlemen and women are in love with wealth. (Image:  pixabay  /  CC0 1.0)
China’s newly rich gentlemen and women are in love with wealth. (Image: pixabay / CC0 1.0)

Professor Wei Sen from China’s Fudan University recently wrote in a report that half of China’s taxes are used to support the government.

Since the implementation of tax reform in 1994, China’s fiscal revenue (money for the government) growth has been almost twice the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) growth every year. In 2016, the national net income in China was more than US$11.1 trillion, or US$6,900 per person.

Such an astronomical amount of money — where did it go? An economy expert, Professor Xu Dianqing from the University of Western Ontario in Canada, said that compared with other countries in the world, China has a big government in an economic sense. It takes in too much and spends too much; in addition, much of the revenue has not gone where it should have.

For example, China’s investment in education versus its GDP ranks 120th in the world, and 140th in medical costs, plus there is a severe shortage of pension funds. In terms of developed nations, funding for national pension systems average some 50 percent of GDP. Using this average, China’s pension system should have more than US$5.5 trillion. Unfortunately, it has been a great effort just to get China’s pension system to reach 1.5 percent of GDP.

Compared with other countries in the world, China has a big government in an economic sense. (Image: pixabay / CC0 1.0)

Compared with other countries in the world, China has a big government in an economic sense. (Image: pixabay / CC0 1.0)

Former Premier Zhu Rongji said in 2000 that if no measures were taken, there would be two outcomes for the current pension system in China: One would be “no money,” resulting in the government acting in bad faith, and the other would be hyperinflation.

Chinese official media have reported that China’s education expenditure was 2.6 percent of GDP, half the international average, while healthcare spending is only at about 4 percent. In the World Health Organization medical fairness list, China ranked fourth from the bottom worldwide.

Wei also said in his report that the cost of medical education in China is only 3.8 percent of China’s GDP, but 23.3 percent in Japan. Such a huge amount of tax money going to the Chinese government, and yet it has a huge amount of debts and deficits at the same time.

He opened the roll and saw a shining piece of gold weighing more than five taels. (Image: pixabay / CC0 1.0)

Such a huge amount of tax money going to the Chinese government, and yet it has a huge amount of debts and deficits at the same time. (Image: pixabay / CC0 1.0)

Professor Zheng Zhuyuan, a Chinese economy expert from Indiana State University, explained it this way: “First, there is overproduction and waste in areas such as steel and cement; second, you have official’s free spending, banquets, and traveling; and third is unbelievable corruption.”

Wei pointed out that administrative expenses for the Chinese government were as high as 25.6 percent of its GDP in 2016.

He suggested that the Chinese government should reduce taxes and return wealth to the people.

A lot of money concentrated in the hands of the government results in wasteful spending, and too little money for the people’s livelihood. Since tax reform will interfere with Chinese interest groups, it is still a question mark.

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