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Watch the Major Meteor Shower ‘Perseid’—Here Are the Details

'If you see one meteor shower this year, make it August's Perseids or December's Geminids,' NASA says. 'The Perseids feature fast and bright meteors that frequently leave trains, and in 2015 there will be no moonlight to upstage the shower.' (Screenshot/YouTube)
'If you see one meteor shower this year, make it August's Perseids or December's Geminids,' NASA says. 'The Perseids feature fast and bright meteors that frequently leave trains, and in 2015 there will be no moonlight to upstage the shower.' (Screenshot/YouTube)

If you love to be romantic or just love to watch the stars, then of August 12-13 is the perfect time to wonder outside. The major meteor shower “Perseid” is back, and this year is the best time to watch as its falls a day before the new moon.

The annual Perseid is known for being one off the brightest of the meteor showers.

With the skies being dark, observers can expect to see up to 100 shooting stars an hour. Astronomy experts have said that with the new moon this will be one of the best conditions since 2010.

“If you see one meteor shower this year, make it August’s Perseids or December’s Geminids,” NASA says. “The Perseids feature fast and bright meteors that frequently leave trains, and in 2015 there will be no moonlight to upstage the shower.”

2015 Perseid shower—What’s up in the sky for August 2015 from NASA:

Senior Editor Michael Bakich of Astronomy magazine loves watching meteor showers, particularly spectacular ones like the Perseid. “It has to be one of the easiest, most relaxing forms of entertainment available to backyard sky gazers,” he says.

“There’s no need for a telescope because optical aid narrows your field of view, and you want to take in as much sky as possible. And best of all, you can observe the spectacle while lying down. Who could ask for more?”

ScienceCasts: The 2012 Perseid Meteor Shower:

According to Astronomy.com, that doesn’t mean you can just walk out the door and see a great show. First, to maximize the number of meteors visible, observe from a rural location without any nearby artificial lights. Battling city sky glow or a neighbor’s security light can wash out fainter meteors just as effectively as a bright Moon would. And the middle of a large field or a hilltop provides a panoramic view that will let you spy more meteors.

Joshua Tree during the 2013 Perseid Meteor Shower:

Swift-Tuttle was discovered independently by two astronomers, Lewis Swift and Horace Tuttle, in 1862. When it last made a pass by Earth in 1992, it was too faint to be seen with the naked eye. The next pass, in 2126, could make it a naked-eye comet similar in brightness to the 1997 Hale-Bopp comet—providing that predictions are correct, according to Space.com.

I can’t wait, should be a great night for it. Hopefully, the weather holds out.

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