Life Lessons: Exposing Children to Hardships

Kindness, tolerance, concentration, and sense of responsibility are prerequisites to enjoying a promising future for a child. (Image:  pixabay  /  CC0 1.0)
Kindness, tolerance, concentration, and sense of responsibility are prerequisites to enjoying a promising future for a child. (Image: pixabay / CC0 1.0)

The other day, I took my son to a bookstore to buy some school supplies. He wanted to buy an expensive, but impractical, pencil case. However, I bought him one that was plain, but practical. He immediately showed his displeasure at my choice.

He also wanted to buy a fancy plastic ruler, but I bought him a plain wooden one. He again showed his displeasure with my selection. I did not say anything, but I wanted to convey to him that too much of a good thing was really not good for him.

Ever since I became a father, I have repeatedly reminded myself to carry out my responsibilities as a parent differently from most Chinese, and let my children experience some hardship. I was always bothered by the concept that no matter how much you suffer, don’t let your children suffer as well.

He also wanted to buy a fancy plastic ruler but I bought him a plain wooden one. (Image: Travis Wise via flickr / CC BY 2.0 )

He also wanted to buy a fancy plastic ruler, but I bought him a plain wooden one. (Image: Travis Wise via flickr / CC BY 2.0 )

Several years ago, an old friend from Australia visited me and gave me some sound advice. He told me that Australian people live well, and they believe that their children need to experience some hardship. They believe that children who have it too easy will not be able to stand on their own.

I accompanied him on a few errands later that day. He pointed to a baby who was wrapped up like a cotton ball and said:

I thought about it again that evening and decided that the Chinese idea of sparing children from all hardship was not the right path. I decided to teach my son the principle of materially poor, but spiritually rich. I was told that a Philadelphia high school had two sculptures on either side of its front gate, an eagle and a horse. These sculptures do not express victory or success, but represent two old tales.

The eagle, in order to accelerate the realization of flying across seven continents, learned a variety of superb flying skills; however, it starved to death because it lacked the skill of foraging.

The horse did not like his first owner, for it had to work hard. His second owner was a farmer, but the horse disliked him because he provided too little food. The horse was next sold to a cobbler. The horse was happy with the cobbler, for it was not worked and had plenty to eat. What a good life, thought the horse! Unfortunately, a few days later, it was butchered by the cobbler.

The horse did not like his first owner for it had to work hard. (Image: pixabay / CC0 1.0)

The horse did not like his first owner, for it had to work hard. (Image: pixabay / CC0 1.0)

From these two tales, we learn that if one does not have basic survival skills, they are not a whole person. Many animals in this world teach their offspring to hunt and survive, but once they are old enough, they have to use what they learned to fend for themselves. We as human beings have to do the same for our children so they can withstand the storms of life and become confident and independent individuals.

Translated by Yi Ming

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