3 Soups That Will Keep You Healthy During Winter

To be healthy, eat plenty of soup. (Image: Robert Judge  via  flickr  /  CC BY 2.0 )
To be healthy, eat plenty of soup. (Image: Robert Judge via flickr / CC BY 2.0 )

When you arrive home and you’re cold and hungry, there is nothing better than sitting down to a hot bowl of soup. Winter has often been given a bad rap, as it brings the cold and flu season. However, with a little effort, there is no reason for your health to suffer during the colder months!

Soup is just what everyone needs in the cold winter months. You can have a quick, healthy, and comforting bowl of soup sitting in front of you before you know it. There’s no better time than now for a bowl of hearty, delicious soup to help warm you up from the inside out. There is no lack of variety when it comes to soup, and different types of soup have different benefits.

Not only will it warm you, soup can also be very healthy.  While the nights are getting colder, why not try out this winter staple for yourself? Here are three of our top picks for the best winter soups:

Whole fish soup

Spicy whole fish soup. (Image: Republic of Korea via flickr / CC BY-SA 2.0)

Spicy whole fish soup. (Image: Republic of Korea via flickr / CC BY-SA 2.0)

Whole fish soup has been regarded as a nutritious food and is considered by many Asians to be particularly good for lactating women as part of the postpartum confinement diet. Fish contains high quality proteins and many essential nutrients, such vitamin A, omega-3 fatty acids, iron, zinc, and calcium.

Whole fish soup is an excellent source of iodine, which is beneficial for the thyroid. Fish also provides a mix of fats, vitamins, minerals that’s perfect for putting your brain in prime condition. It has repeatedly been shown to slow cognitive decline and improve memory.

Chicken soup

Hot chicken soup with ginseng. (Image: kkirugi via flickr / CC BY 2.0 )

Chicken soup with ginseng. (Image: kkirugi via flickr / CC BY 2.0 )

Chicken soup can prevent or lessen the symptoms of the common cold. Since colds are believed to be caused by viral infections in the upper respiratory tract, research has suggested the ingredients in chicken soup slows white blood cells from gathering in the lungs, therefore slowing the progress of irritating side effects, like coughing, sneezing, and a stuffy, runny nose.

In addition to the nutrients from the vegetables and other ingredients, chicken soup also helps you stay hydrated – which is crucial when you’re feeling under the weather. As it is a hearty soup, it’s best for those who are sick to eat small portions.

Pig trotter soup

Pig trotter soup. (Image: bfishadow via flickr / CC BY 2.0 )

Pig trotter soup. (Image: bfishadow via flickr / CC BY 2.0 )

Traditional cultures the world over have included pig trotter or pig feet soup in their diets for thousands of years.  It is high in collagen, the protein responsible for skin and joint health, which is especially important during cold and dry winter months.

Gelatin is another substance found in pig trotter soup and it is one of the most easily digested forms of protein we can obtain. Most people know the job of protein in the human body for growth and repair, but what most don’t know is that gelatin provides protection for your stomach and intestines. Gelatin will actually help to line your stomach and intestines giving you protection against sickness.

Adding peanuts to the soup is common among country folk, both in China and in the U.S. South, as it is especially helpful for lactating women as part of the postpartum confinement diet. As pig trotter soup has a high fat content, patients with high cholesterol should only consume small portions.

The writer of this story is not a medical professional, and the information that is in this story has been collected from reliable sources — and every precaution has been taken to ensure its accuracy. The information provided is for general information purposes only, and should not be substituted for professional health care.

Translated by Chua, B.C. and edited by Kathy McWilliams.

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