The Modern Age of Capsule Hotels

The latest buzz of capsule hotels is of a mini hotel within a bookstore. City Lights in Zhengzhou, China’s Henan Province, is a bookstore that houses 12 capsule rooms.

These rooms are available for guests, more specifically readers, staying overnight. It is based on the concept of capsule hotels, which are predominant in Japan, only in the setting of a bookstore.

A bookstore and a hotel

City Lights, in China, provides basic accommodation facilities for their customers who want to spend some time to simply read and enjoy their book. The 12 rooms are designed particularly to ensure a comfortable reading experience.

Going along with the bookstore theme, each room is named after a famous author and his city of residence. This space is especially great for avid readers who want to escape the hustle and bustle of the city and spend some time to just relax and read.

 

Japan also has a bookstore-inspired capsule hotel. Tokyo’s Book and Bed , started a couple of years before City Lights, aims to cherish falling asleep while doing something you love, in this case reading as an ‘in the moment’ experience, which is the best of its kind.

As a result, the objective is to provide capsule-style sleeping spaces for those who love to curl up in bed with their favorite book.

The era of capsule hotels

Many travelers, especially the young ones, do not wish to spend a lot of money on a place they only want to use to sleep at night. Along with that, the cost of general hotel accommodation is rising, too.

As a result, many are opting for the capsule hotel solution, which provides a place to stay the night at the bare minimum cost. With the rise in number of this specific kind of traveler, more capsule hotels are popping up in many Asian countries.

Most of these hotels generally only charge $10.59 per night, making them an extremely popular choice among frugal travelers or those who aren’t much bothered about the services at a hotel.

Capsule hotels are also famous for providing spaces to nap during the day. They are more flexible, as they charge both by the hour or per night. In contrast, hotels only charge on the basis of the number of nights you stay.

China is facing a serious problem of overworked workers who are constantly exhausted. Here, the hourly plans come in handy, as many workers pop in during the day to catch a power nap.

Toward the future

A study suggests that the global market of capsule hotels is set to reach $226 million by 2022, with Japan and China leading the market, compared to the value of $159 million in 2016.

Earlier, capsule hotel businesses didn’t put much emphasis on their style, services, or comfort. The sole focus was to provide a clean and efficient space for single users.

However, with the rising interest and competition in the accommodations industry as a whole, many are working on adding new technology, concepts, and designs to upgrade the look and feel for the customers, even for those who just come in for a power nap.

The capsule hotel in a bookstore is one such example of personalizing the living experience for customers. Pengheng Space Capsule Hotel also  gives a unique experience to its customers with futuristic sleeping pods and an entire staff of robots!

If you want a glimpse of how a world full of operational robots will be, Pengheng Space Capsule Hotel in China is the place to visit.

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