http://www.visiontimes.com/?p=81924

Check Out This Underwater Greenhouse

The greenhouses are taking advantage of the underwater constant temperatures, and the balloon-like biosphere shape also allows for water to constantly evaporate, which replenishes the plants. 
(Screenshot/YouTube)
The greenhouses are taking advantage of the underwater constant temperatures, and the balloon-like biosphere shape also allows for water to constantly evaporate, which replenishes the plants. (Screenshot/YouTube)

A greenhouse that is at a constant 79ºF with a humidity that is around 83 percent is not a bad environment for most plants. Now, you can have one that does just that.

The only problem with this greenhouse is you need an ocean. This greenhouse is like no other. It sits 20 feet under water. It’s called Nemo’s Garden, and is part of an experimental project that has been going for four years now.

Two years — and many rough storms — later, the company had their fleet of biospheres anchored to the sea floor. (Screenshot/YouTube)

Two years—and many rough storms—later, the company had their fleet of biospheres anchored to the sea floor. (Screenshot/YouTube)

The greenhouses are taking advantage of the underwater constant temperatures, and the balloon like biosphere shape also allows for water to constantly evaporate, which replenishes the plants. Due to high levels of carbon dioxide in the biospheres, the plants are growing like they’re on steroids.

The diving equipment company Ocean Reef Group is operating and monitoring the five biospheres. There are a number of different plants, such as basil, lettuce, strawberries, and beans, that are being grown. The group has a patent on the biosphere, and is planning to build more so they can experiment on other crops, like mushrooms.

Nemo’s Garden Project:

According to The Washington Post, Sergio Gamberini, president of Ocean Reef Group, came up with the “crazy” idea of growing plants under the sea while on a summer vacation in Italy. He immediately made a few calls and started experimenting, sinking the transparent biospheres under the ocean and filling them with air.

“I try to do something that’s a little different, and to show the beauty of the ocean,” Gamberini said. “I hope to do something for the young people, and to inspire new dreams.”

There are a number of different plants, such as basil, lettuce, strawberries and beans that are being grown. (Screenshot/YouTube)

There are a number of different plants, such as basil, lettuce, strawberries, and beans, that are being grown. (Screenshot/YouTube)

Two years—and many rough storms—later, the company had their fleet of biospheres anchored to the sea floor, complete with live Web streaming and sensors collecting data in real time on oxygen and carbon dioxide levels, The Post added.

“It’s been a learning curve,” said Sergio’s son, Luca Gamberini. “We completely lost the crops four times, but it didn’t really matter because we have such great growth rates.”

Nemo’s garden off Italy offers hope for seabed crops:

Although the company says that it has produced a decent crop output every year, they have yet to sell any produce.

But the idea is to raise awareness for a new way of crop production that does not harm the environment.

Luca Gamberini said: “In the future, it’ll definitely be something that’s economically sustainable. I see possibilities for developing countries where harsh conditions make it difficult for plants to grow.”

Although the company says that it has produced a decent crop output every year, their yet to sell any produce. (Screenshot/YouTube)

Although the company says that it has produced a decent crop output every year, they have yet to sell any produce. (Screenshot/YouTube)

In a unexpected turn, it turns out that it is also good for the underwater wildlife. It seems that octopuses and endangered seahorses have developed nurseries beneath the biospheres, with crabs making the inside their home.

“It’s so kind of sci-fi to see these two different forms of life interact,” said Luca Gamberini.

It’s a really good idea, but with the Gamberini’s not willing to sell their product yet, I guess we will just have to wait and see.

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