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Musk Says He Had ‘Major Side Effects’ From COVID Booster Required for Travel to Berlin Tesla Factory

Neil Campbell
Neil lives in Canada and writes about society and politics.
Published: January 23, 2023
Elon Musk was forced to take a second booster to visit the Tesla Berlin Gigafactory and suffered severe adverse reactions.
Elon Musk during the FIFA World Cup Finals between Argentina and France in Qatar in December of 2022. Musk told Twitter that side effects from his second COVID booster injection, which he said he was required to take to visit the Berlin Tesla Gigafactory, “crushed” him. (Image: Dan Mullan/Getty Images)

Elon Musk told readers on his recently-acquired Twitter that a second booster injection of the novel Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) gene therapy vaccines he was required to take to travel to his Tesla Gigafactory in Germany “crushed me.”

The topic was brought to light when Musk responded to creator of the Dilbert comic, Scott Adams, in a Jan. 20 thread. 

Adams posed the question to his 843,000 followers, “How do we interpret this?” in response to a thread from Rasmussen Reports, which stated, “68% of 260M Adults (177M) indicate they received the COVID-19 VAX and 7% of those reported major side effects. That translates (177 x .07) into approx 12M people.”

Musk replied directly to Adams with his own experience of suffering an adverse reaction following acceptance of a second booster injection, “I had major side effects from my second booster shot. Felt like I was dying for several days. Hopefully, no permanent damage, but I dunno.”

The Twitter owner and CEO also added that he wasn’t the only one in his family to suffer significant side effects. His cousin, who Musk described as “young & in peak health” suffered from a serious case of myocarditis” that required a trip to the hospital.

MORE ON THE PANDEMIC’S LONG TERM ISSUES

In a tertiary reply, Elon candidly admitted that he contracted “OG C19 [pre-Delta, pre-Omicron SARS-CoV-2 variants] before vaccines came out,” stating that the symptoms were “basically a mild cold.”

Musk said once vaccines went live, he took the Johnson & Johnson version “with no bad effects, except my arm hurt briefly.”

He added that his boosters were both unspecified brands of the messenger RNA (mRNA) injections, describing the first as “ok,” but that the “second one crushed me.”

The Johnson & Johnson vaccine employs a weakened adenovirus genetically modified to carry a double stranded DNA instruction into the nucleus of human cells that causes them to grow the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, on their surface.

mRNA vaccines work similarly, except they use a messenger RNA instruction encapsulated in a manmade lipid nanoparticle fat to enter the nucleus of the human cell, also for the purpose of causing them to grow the spike protein on the surface.

The thesis of both approaches is to have the human immune system produce an immune response against the spike protein of the actual virus in anticipation of potential exposure.

On Jan. 21, an anonymous account featuring an avatar of the Dr. Evil villain from the Austin Powers movie asked Musk, “You took a 2nd booster shot? I thought you were smarter than that.”

Musk replied, “Was required to visit Tesla Giga Berlin. Not my choice.”

The statements come after a rash of high profile sudden deaths hit the U.S. news media industry, the most recent of which was 47-year-old Fox Media Senior Vice President of News & Politics Alan Komissaroff, who was announced dead the same day as Elon’s thread after suffering a heart attack on Jan. 8 that put Komissaroff into a coma that he did not emerge from.

In late December, two ABC News producers, Erica Gonzalez and 37-year-old fitness enthusiast and George Stephanopoulos producer Dax Tejera likewise died suddenly.

Tejera passed away from a confirmed heart attack, while Gonzalez was only said to have passed in her sleep.

Both Fox News and ABC’s parent company Walt Disney Corporation appear to have mandated COVID vaccination as a condition of employment.